FANDOM


Farm-Fresh balanceYMMVTransmit blueRadarWikEd fancyquotesQuotes • (Emoticon happyFunnyHeartHeartwarmingSilk award star gold 3Awesome) • RefridgeratorFridgeGroupCharactersScript editFanfic RecsSkull0Nightmare FuelRsz 1rsz 2rsz 1shout-out iconShout OutMagnifierPlotGota iconoTear JerkerBug-silkHeadscratchersHelpTriviaWMGFilmRoll-smallRecapRainbowHo YayPhoto linkImage LinksNyan-Cat-OriginalMemesHaiku-wide-iconHaikuLaconicLibrary science symbol SourceSetting
  • Acceptable Political Targets: The writers seem to have a very low opinion of politics. The right wing politics are represented by Megatron's rants and rallies that speak of the good old days and fear mongering. The left wing Autobots are presented as better but also as divided and inefficient.
  • Acceptable Religious Targets: One gets the impression that Sam Maggs, who penned the "Gauging the Truth" arc of Galaxies, has a very dim view of Christianity. The Reversionists are painted as Holier Than Thou religious zealots who have blind loyalty to their leader and will readily wage a religious war on their own people for not being devout enough, essentially taking the Christian missionaries of the Age of Exploration to their logical conclusion. And to add insult to injury, the Reversionists lock up a lesbian couple while taking their child away for "reconditioning."
  • Author's Saving Throw:
    • The idea of a series set on pre-war Cybertron (or rather, one off Earth and without any humans) has won over quite a few people, especially considering the flak IDW took following All Hail Optimus for an increasing focus on Earth and humanity despite the Cybertron based stories being universally better received.
    • To some, the fact that the reboot is pure Transformers and no sign of a new Hasbro Comic Universe anywhere.
    • Featuring more alien species, something that Transformers seems hesitant to do, especially considering that it's a sci-fi franchise. For bonus points, the alien species are all drawn from pre-existing lore, save the notable exception of the Voin.
    • After the controversy regarding Simon Furman's handling of female Transformers in IDW's previous continuity, females are shown here to be nothing special and an ordinary part of Cybertronian society. There's even a female Titan, Lodestar.
    • Cybertron is presented as a truly alien planet with rituals and customs nothing like those on Earth.
    • The Primal lineage is untainted, or at least not wholly corrupt, here, with Nominus Prime having been a good guy and Sentinel undergoing Character Rerailment to his Dreamwave persona.
    • After fears of Bumblebee and Windblade being a Spotlight-Stealing Squad, given their prominence in other major Transformers media, the comic moved away from them around issue 7 and focused on other characters.
  • Broken Base:
    • As mentioned above, the fact that is purely a Transformers reboot. While this is great for Transformers fans, it also means that Visionaries and ROM have gone back to being on life support. Made even worse by the fact that the Hasbro Comic Universe ROM comic was the first time Hasbro did ANYTHING with it since regaining the rights from Marvel. 
    • Shockwave returning. While this was inevitable, after the huge focus he was given in the previous continuity, many felt he was overdue for a rest.
    • All the new female characters. This isn't necessarily due to misogyny but rather questioning why established characters weren't used, even if they were males. After all, Gender Flips are a thing.
    • For all the new ideas and World Building, the comic makes use of many Suspiciously Similar Substitutes. In particular, Codexa is very similar to Alpha Trion and the Reversionists are similar to the Circle of Light.
  • Catharsis Factor: After all the crap Shockwave has pulled over the course of the franchise, seeing him be the recipient of a No-Holds-Barred Beatdown is very satisfying.
  • Character Rerailment:
  • Crack Pairing: The Valentine's Day Episode ships Blast Off/Cosmos.
  • Ensemble Darkhorse:
    • Geomotus gained popularity even before the comic launched for being a neurodivergent character.
    • Lightbright and Lodestar are quite popular after having only one issue focusing on them, especially in the femlash community.
  • Epileptic Trees:
    • Exarchon could control up to three bodies at once. The very same thing that Refraktor (the renamed Reflector) is so known for. And Shockwave is tinkering with something based on Exarchon's powers.
    • Exarchon was also said to be "corrupted" by something in space. Images of a chaos bringing monster planet with a particular hatred for Transformers quickly came to fans' minds.
  • Foe Yay:
    • As always, Optimus Prime/Megatron. Megatron takes it quite personally in issue #16 when he learns that Orion lied to him.
    • Cliffjumper/Deathsaurus, whose interactions consist largely of attempted murder, quickly popped up after the "Wannabee" arc.
  • Growing the Beard: After the first ten or so issues, the story moves away from the slow paced political murder storyline and amps up the buildup to the Great War which seems to have drawn a much warmer reception from the fanbase.
  • Harsher in Hindsight: Either this or a Funny Aneurysm Moment. Issue #20 was delayed due to the COVID-19 outbreak and was eventually released in the midst of the George Floyd protests. The issue featured Police Brutality (up to threatening a handcuffed prisoner with death) and opens protests in front of the capital with slogans about minority rights, police accountability, and one sign reading "No Justice, No Rule." This was all written and drawn months before the protests occurred but it did lead to some controversy among readers (though mainly white ones). It was bad enough that Brian Ruckley took to Twitter to apologize.
  • Ho Yay: Lightbright/Lodestar.
  • Like You Would Really Do It: Killing off Rubble in issue #5 and averting Infant Immortality. Which made it all the more surprising when they really followed through on it.
  • Narm: Megatron's tank mode is maybe just a bit too toy-accurate. He also lacks his fusion cannon making his alternate mode just a bit more silly.
  • Older Than They Think: The Probats. A previous alien race in Transformers, the Observers, also had the ability to... secrete energon.
  • Ships That Pass in the Night: Rubble and Gauge never interacted once, and Rubble is dead, but their pairing has a decent following. Both platonically and romantically.
  • They Wasted a Perfectly Good Character:
    • Brainstorm. One of the most popular characters of MTMTE/Lost Light, and he's dead by the end of issue 1.
    • Issue #4 has a newborn, Gauge, being given to Arcee who's noted to be Heterosexual Life Partners with Greenlight. Many questioned why Arcee was used instead of Lancer, Greenlight's traditional HLP for 30+ years.
    • Rubble. He was a fresh set of optics and he's dead by issue #5.
    • Orion Pax's mentor was Codexa, the Chief Archivist. The obvious question is why Alpha Trion, Optimus' mentor for 30+ years, and the Archivist of the Primes, wasn't utilized.
    • While the lack of humans drew many cheers, some fans viewed Cybertron's Hubworld state as a way to introduce the human race as a spacefaring species, giving a new twist to human/Cybertronian first contact.
  • Unexpected Character:
    • Given that Heretech was a rather minor character in Transformers More Than Meets the Eye, his important role here came as a shock to many fans.
    • Shadow Striker. Particularly a new version of her Transformers: Cyberverse counterpart. As a relatively new character when she made her debut, not many saw her coming.
    • Vigilem returned in Issue #16.
    • Issue #21 had a new incarnation of Azimuth. A prose character from The Covenant of Primus whose only major claims to fame were recycling an old toy design and being a Good Counterpart to Galvatron. While Aligned!Galvatron got a few more mentions, Azimuth got none, making her reappearance even more surprising.
Community content is available under CC-BY-SA unless otherwise noted.