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2015-10-29

Actors Sean Nix as Milo Tindle and Darryl Maximilian Robinson as Andrew Wyke in the 2000 Excaliber Shakespeare Company of Chicago's 30th Anniversary Revival Production of Anthony Shaffer's Tony Award-winning Best Play "Sleuth" directed by Mr. Robinson at The Harrision Street Galleries Studio Theatre in Oak Park, Il. Photo by Andy Carlson.

Darryl Maximilian Robinson as Andrew Wyke in the 2000 Excaliber Shakespeare Company of Chicago production of Sleuth.

Actor / Director Darryl Maximilian Robinson as Andrew Wyke in the 2000 Excaliber Shakespeare Company of Chicago's 30th Anniversary Revival Production of Anthony Shaffer's Tony Award-winning Best Play "Sleuth" at The Harrison Street Galleries Studio Theatre in Oak Park, Il. Photo by Andy Carlson.

Director Darryl Maximilian Robinson as Andrew Wyke and Sean Nix as Milo Tindle in the 2000 Excaliber Shakespeare Company of Chicago production as Anthony Shaffer's SLEUTH.

Actors Darryl Maximilian Robinson as Andrew Wyke and Sean Nix as Milo Tindle in the 2000 Excaliber Shakespeare Company of Chicago's 30th Anniversary Revival Production of Anthony Shaffer's Tony Award-winning Best Play "Sleuth" directed by Mr. Robinson at The Harrison Street Galleries Studio Theatre in Oak Park, Il. Photo by Andy Carlson.

2015-11-12

Actor Sean Nix starred as Milo Tindle in the 2000 Excaliber Shakespeare Company of Chicago's 30th Anniversary Revival Production of Anthony Shaffer's Tony Award-winning Best Play "Sleuth" directed by Darryl Maximilian Robinson at The Harrison Street Galleries Studio Theatre in Oak Park, Il. Photo by Andy Carlson.

Darryl Maximilian Robinson Directed and Starred as Andrew Wyke in The 2000 Excaliber Shakespeare Company production of Sleuth at The Harrison Street Studio Theatre of Oak Park

In 2000, the multiracial chamber theatre, The Excaliber Shakespeare Company of Chicago staged a 30th Anniversary Revival Production of Anthony Shaffer's "Sleuth" starring Darryl Maximilian Robinson as Andrew Wyke and Sean Nix as Milo Tindle at The Harrison Street Galleries Studio Theatre in Oak Park, Il. The production was the first documented staging of Anthony Shaffer's Tony Award-winning Best Play that featured an all African-American cast. The production directed by Mr. Robinson was critically-praised by The Pioneer Press Oak Leaves theatre critic Michael Bonesteel and by The Wednesday Journal of Oak Park drama critic Doug Deuchler.

A 1970 Tony Award-winning Best Play by Anthony Shaffer, which became an acclaimed Oscar-nominated 1972 film, also written by Anthony Shaffer, and, most recently, a 2007 film adapted by Harold Pinter.

Andrew Wyke, a mystery writer, realizes his wife is having an affair with hair salon owner Milo Tindle. He finds in Milo the opportunity to divorce his wife, but he needs to avoid having to pay alimony. So, he challenges the younger man to rob his house; Milo can get rich off his loot, while the insurance company will handsomely reimburse Andrew. Milo complies; but just as he pulls it off, things get really complicated.


This features examples of:

  • Anti-Hero: Milo in the 1972 film is only in it to punish Andrew for the pain he caused him. In the 2007 film Milo is revealed to be a sociopath on Andrew's level.
  • The Chessmaster: Both Milo and Andrew.
  • Disney Death: Milo. He's not so lucky the second time.
  • Evil Plan / Kansas City Shuffle: The scheme in the opening paragraph was just a precursor to Andrew's real scheme: to humiliate Milo, by means of shooting him with blanks, because he, a middle-class hairdresser, dared to mingle with the upper class. Its the former because it starts and drives the plot. Its the second because the one being schemed thought they knew where to look and what was going on but the real scheme is coming from another direction. From there it gets a lot more complicated.
  • Famous Last Words: See the page quote.
    • Only in the film. In the play, the line is "Game, set, match," and doubles as an Ironic Echo.
  • Foe Yay: The homosexual undertones present in the original are made much more explicit by the remake:

 Black: You gave him... a pat... on the bum?

Wyke: Metaphorically.

Black: You gave him a metaphorical pat on the bum?

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