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Granddad: We don't use the "n-word" in this house!

Huey: Granddad, you said the word "nigga" 46 times yesterday. I counted!

Granddad: Nigga, hush!

A character with a distinguishing characteristic of swearing noticeably more, or at least in harsher words, than the rest of the cast.

Keep in mind that this is relative; if everyone swears a lot, that's not this trope. Conversely, in works where swearing is otherwise nonexistent, a character can be this even if the worst that comes out of their mouths would look very tame in other contexts. Not all works have one of these: a lot of the time most or all of the major characters use about the same amount of profanity, or if some do swear more it is not by enough of a margin to make it a noticeable aspect of the character. What matters here is that a character is set apart by swearing more than everyone (or nearly everyone) else in the same work.

These characters are likely to drop Cluster F Bombs where they're allowed to. Otherwise they may be doomed to Gosh Dang It to Heck. May also be subjected to The Swear Jar.

Compare/Contrast The Snark Knight and Knight in Sour Armor.

Examples of Sir Swearsalot include:


Anime & Manga

 King Dedede: Hey. What is that damn thing?

Escargoon: Sire, how am I supposed to know? But whatever it is, I think our friend at Nightmare Enterprises would be very interested in it.


Comic Books

  • Christabella, Creator's Pet from the In Name Only Silent Hill comics published by IDW. More jarring because the character is an Eldritch Abomination in the body of a little girl.
  • Oyuki-Chan from Empowered cusses every third word, no matter what she's talking about and even when she's completely calm.
  • Zodon, in PS238 is apparently a terrible pottymouth -- which is especially bad given that he's an elementary school student. To keep him in line he's been fitted with a brain chip which replaces his swear words with random nouns and verbs, and turns entire rants of obscenity into showtunes.


Films

  • Jay from the View Askewniverse.
  • Happy Gilmore: After he misses a putt, the censor-bleeps can't keep up with him.
  • Tony Montana in Scarface.
  • Harry from In Bruges.
  • Roman Moronie in Johnny Dangerously sends this up.
    • "What a mouth on that guy!"
  • People swear in Tropic Thunder, but Tom Cruise's character is possibly the king of this trope. He has a dirtier mouth than Eric Cartman and Jay from Kevin Smith's movies put together.
    • Tom Cruise is also the sole reason for Rain Man's R-Rating. He's the only character who swears in the movie and it has no significant acts of violence.
    • It's a pretty memorable trait of his character in Magnolia as well.
    • Speaking of Magnolia, on top of Tom Cruise's character, Earl and Linda Partridge are also pretty good examples of this trope, ESPECIALLY Linda. This is already a movie where most of the cast is quite liberal when it comes to using Cluster F Bombs, but in just about every scene Linda's in, she takes the usage of the trope Up to Eleven, not an easy thing to do in a movie like that.
  • Also, any character played by Samuel L. Jackson will be interpreted as this, because people seem to like hearing him say "motherfucker."
    • Interestingly subverted in Jumper. A PG-13 movie, they gave that one, coveted f-bomb to Jamie Bell's character, Griffin, instead.
  • Frank Booth from Blue Velvet who drops F bombs at least once per sentence. Made more apparent in that he is the only character in the film to use the word (besides a character who does it at Frank's request).
  • Detective David Mills from Se7en.

 Mills: Fucking Dante! Goddamn poetry-writing faggot, piece of shit! Fucker!

 The Stranger: Do you really have to use so many cuss words?

The Dude: What the fuck are you talking about?

    • His friend Walter also has an equally foul mouth, especially where Donny is concerned.
  • Gunnery Sergeant Hartman in Full Metal Jacket.
  • Steve Stifler from the American Pie series.
  • Carl Showalter from Fargo. It's somewhat justified considering what he goes through during the course of the film, which tends to result in angry tirades on his part, but it's also clearly meant to serve as a contrast to the Gosh Dang It to Heck speech that the Gundersons, the Lundergaards, and for the most part, the rest of the town are accustomed to.
  • Ralphie's dad from A Christmas Story, though it's mostly just unintelligible shouting due to censoring.

  Adult Ralphie: My father worked in profanity the way other artists might work in oils or clay. It was his true medium, a master.

  • Little Miss Sunshine has the grandpa, and later on, Dwayne, starting when he realizes he's colour blind and therefore, can't fly planes. He breaks his vow of silence with an enormous Atomic F-Bomb, and from there, most of his limited dialogue consists of one small Cluster F-Bomb after another.
  • Osbourne Cox from Burn After Reading. He's a bit of a unique example in that he doesn't swear as naturally as most other examples on this page, but due to having a mean Hair-Trigger Temper, he tends to drop F words in almost every sentence whenever he's upset (which is a lot), accumulating for just over half of the movie's total F bombs.
  • Gawain Mac Sam from the remake of The Lady Killers, especially compared to the other main characters. A couple of the one scene characters shown near the beginning such as Weemack and the tv commercial director could qualify as well. Gee, The Coen Brothers sure like having these types of characters in their movies, don't they?
  • Seth in Superbad. The entire movie is really vulgar, but Seth could probably be considered the live action equivalent of Cartman, who manages to stick out despite almost everyone cussing like there's no end.
  • Kyle in Fifty Fifty, although considering he's played by Seth Rogen, this probably doesn't surprise anyone.
  • Nino in Drive.
  • The entire Twenty One Jump Street movie is such an epic swearfest that it's almost easier to list characters that cuss all the time than it is to name ones that don't. However, there is still no one else that can match the proficiency of the well-oiled swearing machine that is Captain Dickson.
  • Charles and Cary from Super 8, especially Charles. Being a PG-13 rated movie, it's not as noticeable as other examples, but the movie itself is heavy on profanity for one with that rating, and if you pay attention, somewhere between 80 to 90 percent of that language is from these two alone.
  • Sheriff J.W. Pepper from the James Bond installments, Live and Let Die and The Man with the Golden Gun swears noticeably often for any character from a James Bond movie. Not only that, but in his first appearance, he even came close to being the only character to use the F word in the entire series!


Literature

  • Ron from the Harry Potter books and films doesn't get to drop any F-bombs, but most of the other characters aren't noted in the narrative to "swear loudly" or say "bloody hell" nearly as much as him.
    • He does use the term "effing" in the books, along with Uncle Vernon.
    • Surprisingly, it's Molly Weasley who pushes the foul language barrier further than any other character with her iconic "NOT MY DAUGHTER, YOU BITCH!" line. Aunt Marge also uses the word "bitch", but it's a biological reference, while Molly uses it as an insult.
    • Well, to Molly's credit, said bitch did try to kill her daughter. Marge's bit was likely meant as a cover, being the only way to safely get it into a kid's book.
  • Holden Caulfield in The Catcher in The Rye, whose constant cussing was one of the main reasons the book created so much controversy at the time. Oddly enough, he actually dislikes the F word despite his nack for using other words all the time.
  • The hunchbacked sorcerer Beldin in The Belgariad has a hideous body, horrid manners and an equally foul mouth. But underneath it all, he's just a big softie.
  • Uno from Wheel of Time gets called out on this by other characters, especially Nynaeve.
    • Also Mat. Again, Nynaeve ain't happy. Wanders into serious Narm territory when you see that "Blood and ashes!" and "Mother's milk in a cup!" apparently constitutes heinous swearing in Randland.
  • Subverted with Mr. Tulip, who doesn't --ing swear. He just says "--ing" a --ing lot.
  • A Song of Ice and Fire has a few (who still stand out thanks to Loads and Loads of Characters). Complete Monsters Gregor Clegane and Rorge have never actually met but still seem to be competing to see who can swear more while committing horrific acts of rape and dismemberment, but there's an otherwise irrelevant Mook nicknamed "Shitmouth" who can out-swear them both. In A Dance With Dragons, Asha interacts with Ser Clayton Suggs, a low born knight, and about 90% of those interactions consist of him calling her a cunt.
  • Sharon/Shaz from the Bridget Jones books and movies, "Likes to say 'fuck'. A lot".
  • "Sally" Sweet in the Stephanie Plum series. He can barely get through a sentence without at least one F-bomb.


Live-Action TV

  • Dave from Flight of the Conchords drops all but one of the F-bombs on the show. Those of the duo's songs that contain the F-word have helpfully been modified to use "flip" instead, as the characters they play in the show aren't given to swearing.
  • Malcolm Tucker from The Thick of It and its spin off movie In the Loop.
    • Also from those works, Jamie Macdonald, nicknamed "The Crossest Man In Scotland."
  • Vince from Mongrels who is clinically incapable of getting through a sentence without at least three swearwords.
  • Calamity Jane in Deadwood has the notable distinction of being the most foul mouthed character in a Cluster F-Bomb cast. She keeps a swear jar for whenever she swears around little Sophia, with the intention of giving her the money.
    • Don't forget Al Swearengen. He's at least as infamous for this as Calamity Jane is, if not more. I mean, where do you think his name comes from?
  • Sir Gwain in Merlin. While it is a family show, and therefore the number of swears is limited, more than once he has sworn in the background in an indistinct manner, sounding like fuck.
  • Debra Morgan in Dexter was even swearing more than anyone as a child, according to a flashback. Dexter even introduces her to the viewers on the first episode as, "my foul-mouth step sister".
    • Once, when being confronted by an Internal Affairs agent, over the course of the conversation, she manages to use every single obscenity in the English language, excluding racial slurs.
    • Ladies and gentlemen, Debra Fucking Morgan.
    • At one point, she's forced to give a press conference, and can't help dropping an f-bomb on air. When she sees herself on tv later, complete with bleeped-out obscenity, her response, in a hospital waiting room full of kids: "oh, fuck."
  • Susie Greene and Leon Black in Curb Your Enthusiasm.
  • Batiatus from the the most recent Spartacus adaptation Spartacus: Blood and Sand, especially when he's suffering from a Villainous Breakdown.
  • Most of the cast from Boardwalk Empire is quite used to dropping profanity all over the place, but the Commodore sticks out as being the worst. The part that may surprise some people about it is that he's a SENIOR.
  • Inverted by Omar in The Wire -- in spite of being a major Badass, he's the only character who refuses to curse and admonishes others for doing so constantly.
  • Virtually every character in Misfits qualifies, but Nathan and Kelly are probably the worst.
  • Another Life (2019 TV series) has Michelle Vargas, the Salvare's communications expert, really the expert as she likes to curse when things go south.


Newspaper Comics

  • Rat of Pearls Before Swine, whose swearing is censored with symbols.
  • It is implied in one strip of Beetle Bailey that Sergeant Snorkel, of all the soldiers at Camp Swampy, was the absolute worst when it came to swearing. Basically, the resident minister of the camp was complaining to one of the officers about the amount of swearing going on at the camp, and suggests Sarge teach them not to swear, to the officer's shock and exhasperation. It then cuts to Sarge accidentially hurting himself with a tack that he was going to place on a bulletin board, and utters a long list of profanities (all censored), and the officer, telling the minister, who is covering his ears, that the long list of profanities he is uttering is only for a tack prick, implying that the list is even longer and far more profane with more serious injuries/more angering situations.
  • Darryl MacPherson in Baby Blues has a swearing problem (particularly when irritated or after injuring himself, with him once somehow managing to write a swear word on a note identifying a coffee table that was intended to help one of the kids identify furniture after stubbing his leg on it).
  • As noted with the trope quote, Grampa Freeman from The Boondocks is quite foul-mouthed, in particular with the N-word, having done so at least 46 times the day before.


Tabletop Games


Videogames

  Cid: "Shut up! Sit your ass down in that chair, and drink your goddamn tea!"

  "I'm gonna RENOVATE your ass!"

 Ragna: Take this, you son of a bitch!

Kokonoe: You son of a bitch! Do you know how hard it was to find you?!

    • Kokonoe takes her language much further than that, often getting creatively censored as a result. Let's try this dialogue from Rachel's gag reel in Continuum Shift:

 Noel: Ms. Kokonoe. What were you going to do to Mr. Ragna the Bloodedge after you put him to sleep?

Kokonoe: Well, no reason not to tell you. First I intended to take his [1] and put it in a [2]. Maybe a little [3] too? My goodness, I can only imagine what his [4] will [5]!

Noel: Wh-wh-WHAT?! How could you stoop so low? That's totally unfair!

Kokonoe: Like I care. Keep dreaming, kid. I'm gonna make Ragna mine!

    • Hazama is pretty bad for this as well.

 "OK, what makes you think I give two shits about a vampire tea-party?"

"Hey, shitty vampire? Who's laughing now?"

"Yeah, a huge failure. Real pain in the ass to keep the Cauldron under control. But hey, we learned all sorts of shit in the process, so, you know..."

    • Makoto isn't as bad as the previous offenders, but she is still quite a potty mouth.

 "Meh. I should quit bitching. A job's a job. Can't help the family out just sitting on my tail."

"Sleepy? That baby's wide awake - and pissed!"

"What the fuuu-?"

  • Jack in Mass Effect 2.
    • In Mass Effect 3, she has to continually cut her curses short whenever her students are listening.
  • Bulletstorm was called "Captain Swearword's Big Fuckin' Adventure" by Rock Paper Shotgun for good reason, but even the main character is surprised by the walking, talking swear factory called General Sarrano.
  • Kaine from Nie R. The very first thing you hear when booting up the game is her delivering a Cluster F-Bomb to Weiss.
  • Detective Isaac Washington from House of the Dead OVERKILL, where the game earns the title by dropping 189 F-bombs in a normal three-hour playthrough, enough for a Guinness World Record.
  • Kumatora in Mother 3, being the Tomboy that she is. Lighter as well, to a lesser extent.
  • Garlot and Leon in Blaze Union, both of whom have awful tempers. After the Time Skip in route A, Garlot's new speech patterns as Gulcasa have him swearing a bit less and becoming more eloquent--probably due to coaching by Nessiah.
  • In Hyperdimension Neptunia, out of the four goddesses of Gamindustri, White Heart is the one that drops the highest amount of S-bombs. As a sample, a few lines she says during the intro sequence:

 White Heart: I won't let any of you selfish, icy bitches take the title of True Goddess!

White Heart: (Having received a derisive comment from Green Heart about her flat chest) The hell's that? Listen to that crap, talkin' out yer ass! I'll kill you! DIE!

  • Dana Mercer from Prototype, notable not for swearing the most out of all the cast (which includes her salty-mouthed and hot-tempered brother and several dozen soldiers, who swear like, well, soldiers), but for swearing so much and so colourfully that the Blackwatch trooper in the middle of kidnapping her was taken aback. Her favourite appears to be the f-bomb and its variants.
  • The Witcher: Thaler has a mouth about a magnitude fouler than that of any other character in the game. That says quite a lot, as pretty much everyone swears regularly and he still manages to stick out.
  • Rance can weaponize it in some of his games.
  • Enzo in Bayonetta swears even when it doesn't make sense to swear. It's likely that he swears the most out of everyone in the game, despite having the least screentime and the fact that the game has no shortage of F-bombs.
  • The Left 4 Dead series takes full advantage of being Rated M, and drops more S bombs than you can shake a stick at. However, of all the characters, Coach stands out. Just try going a full sixty seconds without hearing him swear, it will fail.
  • Feinne's Let's Play of Soul Nomad and The World Eaters recorded the number of times Gig swore. Oh, and Gig is definitely this trope.

  Yeah, I said "shit" 33 times. Got a problem with it, numbnuts?


Webcomics


Web Originals


Western Animation

  • Fowlmouth/Foulmouth from Tiny Toon Adventures; bleeps in the show, "Dad Gum" in The Movie. It's noted, however, that Fowlmouth cleans up his language when there are little kids nearby.
  • Krueger from Undergrads.
  • Though almost everyone in South Park swears except for Butters (usually) most of it comes from Eric Cartman.
  • Parodied on Codename: Kids Next Door with Pottymouth, a rarely seen villain who uses child-caliber profanity in literally every sentence he utters.

 "Oh, go flush yourself down a pee-pee-hole, you toilet paper covered doody head!"

  • Palpatine in the Robot Chicken Star Wars specials was probably the worst offender in regards to swearing. In particular, he uttered exactly nine usages of the F-word, six of which were in a chain, in the skit where Vader calls him at his office when telling him about the destruction of the Death Star. He later gives four usages of the F-word in a later skit detailing his bad day on the Death Star, two of which were, again, in a chain. In fact, with the exception of two Stormtroopers in Episode II and Lando Calrissian, a large majority of the more profane language (ie, the ones that are required to be bleeped out when in syndication) are from Palpatine's mouth.


Real Life

  • New York Rangers coach John Tortorella is quite given to expletives, in contrast to his basketball counterparts. In January of 2012, he called his boss's early Stanley Cup prediction "a bunch of bullshit".
  • Former Prime Minister of Australia Paul Keating was infamous for his barnyard vocabulary while still in office (probably he still drops the odd Cluster F-Bomb), being very much the guttermouth by Australian political standards - link:http://www.webcity.com.au/keating/
  • Gordon fucking Ramsay
  • Pamela Segal, according to fellow voice actress April Winchell.
  • In an interview with Electronic Gaming Monthly, somebody associated with him said that in day-to-day life, every sentence John Madden says contains the F-word, and they find it remarkable that he's able to turn that off when he's on the air.

Notes

  1. (Inferno Divider!)
  2. (Carnage Scissors!)
  3. (Gauntlet Hades!)
  4. (Hell's Fang!)
  5. (Dead Spike!)
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