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File:Heavilyarmoredmook 1517.png


Your basic Mooks, now with armor (or more armor, better armor, or a shield). Given that, they will be much harder to defeat, but slower to move. At least, you hope they're slower... May also have better weapons.

Your best bet is to use a Armor-Piercing Attack . You can also try attacking the back, or just plain breaking out your most powerful moves.

Typically, having such heavy armor will invoke Didn't Need Those Anyway.

Often overlaps with Giant Mook. A form of Kung Fu-Proof Mook, where the Kung Fu is normal attacks. If everything seems to be like this, you actually have Incredibly Durable Enemies. See also Elite Mooks, Shield Bearing Mook, Invincible Minor Minion, The Spiny, and Metal Slime. An aversion of Armor Is Useless.

Examples of Heavily Armored Mook include:


Anime and Manga


Film


Tabletop Game

  • Extremely common in both versions of Warhammer. In Warhammer Fantasy, probably the most well known are the Warriors of Chaos, who are an army of evil warriors covered from head to toe cool evil armor, though the heavy cavalry for each faction, if they had any, could also be considered this. Even if a faction didn't have that, they would often have some heavily armored foot soldiers, such as the Black Orcs for the Orcs and Goblins. In Warhammer 40000, all of the Space Marine armies fall under this trope.


Video Games

  • God of War always replaces the normal undead soldiers with these after a certain point in the game. In Chains of Olympus the Cyclopses also have armored version that you need to break the armour off of before they can be damaged.
  • Some games in the The Legend of Zelda franchise feature Darknuts and Iron Knuckles, heavily armored enemies that only have one weakness.
  • Metroid Prime: The early stages have "Plated" versions of regular enemies who are harder to damage (most are resistant to the beam weapons you have, but not missiles).
    • Same goes for the Armoured Pirate Troopers in Corruption.
  • Resident Evil 4
  • Paper Mario: Koopatrols
  • Modern Warfare 2: Juggernauts. Unfortunately under certain circumstances they prove to be fast-charging Lightning Bruisers...
  • Transformers: War for Cybertron: the Brute enemy
  • Dragon Ball Z: Buu's Fury, in Babidi's Spacheship, there are Majin Warriors. By that point, you can kill them with a few hits, though some have breakable shields.
  • Fallout 3: as the PC progresses in levels, the Super Mutants begin to appear decked out in more and more armor. Throughout the series, human adversaries tend to have better armor as the player progresses.
  • Super Mario RPG: Most of the Mooks Mario Co. fight make reappearances later in armor or armor-like features.
  • Castlevania: At least one game in the series throws fleamen wearing chariot-like armor at you.
  • Assassin's Creed has guards wear more armour as they become more proficient, with the most-armoured ones being Elite Mooks effectively identical to full-powered Altaïr in abilities.
    • Assassin's Creed II has Brutes. All this does, in practice, is give them more health. They're also quite hard to hit with your weapons (as most guards are). Your best bet is disarming them (particularly satisfying in Brotherhood, where you can throw the axe/huge sword right into their torso) and using their weapon against them, or countering with your hidden blade. Which, yes, stabs right through their metal armour on a few particular finishers. Admittedly, some times, Ezio may just be stabbing them through the eyehole. And right into the brain.
    • Assassin's Creed: Revelations takes this Up to Eleven with Almogavars, which can survive Hidden Gun shots where Brutes could not.
  • Razing Storm has HACS. These serve as the tough enemies, as everything else except for the Humongous Mecha tends to go down fast.
  • The Tower Defense game Tower Madness has the Armored Alien, although it shows more traits of Crippling Overspecialization. Each of the three variants resist one of the three damage types but take more from the other two.
  • Knight-class enemies in Fire Emblem games generally require magic or a very strong axe-wielder to take down. Typically they have lower speed and movement than other classes which makes it easier to surround them and then double attack them.
  • In some of the Dynasty Warriors games, the Nanman army wears bamboo armor, which is immune to arrows.
  • Metal Gear Solid 3 Snake Eater has squads of Elite Mooks with Riot shields who show up in certain areas if your suspected of being nearby. Explosives and shots from behind the shield both work, but there's a special sense of accomplishment reserved for those who headshot them right through the eye slot.
  • Einhander has a Mook in stage 2 known as "Star" (German for "Starling"), which returns as a tougher armored version known as "Panzerstar" (Armoured Starling) in stage 5.
  • Plants vs. Zombies starts with an unarmored zombie and a slightly tougher zombie using a traffic cone as protection. The heavily armor zombies use a metal bucket on their head. The Football Zombie is heavily armored and fast.
  • Dawn of War: Dark Crusade has Mega Armored Nobz for the Orks. While they are rather slow they can surge the armor to go faster, electrocuting themselves in the process due to shoddy construction.
  • F.E.A.R. games have the Heavy Armor Replicas who usually tot weapons that bring more hurt, typically those that are best used on them instead.
  • Jedi Outcast has heavily armoured Superpowered Mooks; the Shadow Troopers, who have been given artificially heightened Force powers, and lightsabers, and are protected by (literally speaking light) armour made with cortosis, a metal so tough it resists lightsabers. Good thing it isn't actually impervious to them in this version.
    • The following game, Jedi Academy, gives us hazard troopers. Their suits are more like Mini-Mecha, these ginormous death-suits that let them walk in lava like it's nothing. They're armed with concussion rifles, which will really ruin your day. It's basically the only kind of Imperial that still presents a threat when you've got your lightsaber.
  • The Army of Two games have "heavy" soldiers, typically enemy mooks who are wearing some variant of heavy EOD gear who only take damage from behind. In the sequel there are several variants of the heavies, including shotgun heavies (who can count as Lightning Bruiser) while later on there are minigun heavies, grenade launcher heavies, and flamethrower heavies. The shotgun heavies can be killed with concentrated, high-damage fire, especially against the head, while the latter three types can only be killed by shooting specific weakpoints on their backs (ammo canister, grenade boxes, or fuel tanks, respectively).
  • One level of Syphon Filter 2 has fully-armored mooks who can only be killed with explosives. At least three bosses in the series are also explosion-proof, and must be defeated by unconventional means.
  • Halo's Hunters. At first they could easily be taken down with a single pistol shot to their weak points, but as the series went on, they became tougher, faster, and harder to hit on their weak points.
  • The Belltower Heavies and Ogres from Deus Ex Human Revolution, who also carry Heavy Rifles.
  • Turok 2 has Juggernauts, Lords of the Flesh, Mantid Soldiers, and Troopers. The former two are also Lightning Bruisers.
  • In Iron Brigade, Breakers are slower than the standard cannon-fodder Resistors, but have a thick armored shell that can only be destroyed with explosives (such as an artillery cannon). Once this is destroyed, their mobility increases and they become vulnerable to most weapons.
  • Borderlands has variants of some enemies, such as Hardened Skags, which have thick carapaces that reduce damage in certain areas. The Lance Troopers also have armour plating over most of their body; Badass Lance enemies are completely immune to attacks that don't hit their unarmoured points.
  • Assault types in Battlestar Galactica Online. To illustrate, the weakest of the bog-standard Cylon Raiders has 250 hp. The equivalent Assault Strike, the Marauder? 515.


Real Life

  • Plate-clad knights, of course.
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