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  • And You Thought It Would Fail: The title theme was almost taken out of the film because Harry Saltzman hated it, saying "That's the worst fucking song I've ever heard in my fucking life".
  • Award Snub: Neither John Barry's score nor Shirley Bassey's theme song received Oscar nominations.
  • Awesome Art: Ken Adam's set-design, in particular Goldfinger's drawing room with the revolving pool table and the Fort Knox interior.
  • Broken Base:
    • It's one of the most popular Bond films, but there is some debate over whether this, From Russia with Love, On Her Majesty's Secret Service, The Spy Who Loved Me, Licence to Kill, Goldeneye or Casino Royale is the definitive Bond film.
    • Some fans are conflicted over the fact that, in the film, Bond seduces Pussy Galore to the point of making her change sides. In the book, she is a lesbian, leading to accusations of homophobia against the film, even though, save for one line of dialogue where Pussy says she's immune to Bond's charms (which could be interpreted several ways), the film contains no reference to the character being LGBTQ.
      • It's also somewhat nullified by the fact that, according to the book, she's not ACTUALLY a lesbian, she was just molested by a male relative when she was a child and never got over it until meeting Bond, meaning that, while it may be considered homophobic to not include Pussy's lesbianism in the film, it wasn't exactly a good representation of lesbianism in the first place, since it was "cured" by sex with a man.
  • Cargo Ship: Goldfinger and his gold.
  • Crazy Awesome: Painting people gold, smuggling gold even though he could acquire it legally, planning to bifurcate Bond with a LASER, building a scale model map used ONCE for a short briefing, detonating a particularly dirty bomb in Fort Knox. Goldfinger's absolute obsessive mania for gold drives him to extreme action, and by accumulating it enables him in even more. Crazy begets awesome begets crazy...
  • Crowning Music of Awesome: GOOOOOOOLLLLLLLLD-FINNNNNN-GAAAAAAAAAAH!
  • Designated Hero: If you analyze well, apart from "converting" Pussy Galore and killing Oddjob, Bond's actions aren't really that effective.
  • Ensemble Darkhorse:
    • Oddjob. Probably the most copied and parodied Bond villain of all time, he even got his own Vicks 44 commercial. Not just copies and parodies, but homages too. Kung Lao, we're looking at you!
    • Goldfinger himself is a good example. He's easily the most famous Big Bad from the film series, even over Blofeld and Dr. No. Quite an achievement when you consider that this is the only Bond film starring Sean Connery that doesn't involve Blofeld or SPECTRE.
    • Pussy Galore just might be the most famous Bond Girl of all time, or at the very least tied with Honey Ryder, and not just for her Punny Name, but for being one of the first no-nonsense Femme Fatales in the franchise, that is redeemed by Bond, which would become a recurring theme, well in the film franchise at least. Not to mention her excellent portrayal by Honor Blackman.
  • Fair for Its Day:
    • While some of the film's treatment of women is not politically correct according to the generally prevailing standards of today, it does present women such as Pussy Galore as competent and in a generally positive way. This is especially noticeable when compared to the novel it adapts (written only a few years earlier), which not only seems to assume that an Action Girl must be a psychologically damaged lesbian, but also includes an extended Aesop against homosexuality and women's suffrage.
    • Oddjob being a mute Asian who is completely subservient to a white villain might raise a few eyebrows today, but he's nonetheless depicted as being extremely competent and a terrifying foe for Bond.
  • Genius Bonus: Goldfinger's first name Auric. "Aurum" means "gold" in Latin.
  • Growing the Beard: While Dr. No and From Russia with Love are still well thought of, it was Goldfinger that was the first Bond to be a huge hit at the box office (to the point that some theaters were holding showings 24 hours a day to meet demand), establish most of the tropes common to the series and show how flat-out awesome Bond could be.
  • Hilarious in Hindsight: "That's as bad as listening to The Beatles without earmuffs." Guess who recorded the theme to Live and Let Die?
    • And guess who would later do a spoken word cover of "In My Life"?
    • In all fairness, however, this line may have been a Take That aimed not at the Beatles themselves, but rather the hordes of screaming fangirls at their concerts and shows. Seeing as this film was released in 1964, Beatlemania was in full effect...
    • Also, Ringo Starr married a Bond girl (Barbara Bach from The Spy Who Loved Me).
  • It Was His Sled:
    • The Reveal about what Goldfinger's Evil Plan really is has lost much of its original impact. Still a bloody good plan, though.
    • Oddjob's metal-rimmed hat gets him electrocuted. It's one of the most iconic moments in the franchise.
  • Love to Hate:
    • Goldfinger, who has a perfect blend of cruelty, charm and brilliance that makes him one of Bond's most popular foes.
    • Oddjob. Despite having no lines, Harold Sakata's rather terrifying screen presence made Oddjob, along with Red Grant from the previous film, the iconic Bond henchmen. Indeed, every henchman after this is an Expy of either Oddjob or Grant.
  • Memetic Mutation: The crotch laser scene, along with the line "No, Mr. Bond, I expect you to DIE!"
  • Moral Event Horizon: Goldfinger has a knack of crossing lines, such as poisoning an army barracks and the surrounding town - 60,000 people (he shrugs this off by saying that motorists kill as much in two years) - and then detonating a nuclear device in Fort Knox to trigger a major economic crisis for his own profit.
    • Or when he kills his assistant Jill Masterson by having her covered in toxic golden paint.
    • Or when he has Oddjob kill Jill's sister Tilly for trying to avenge Jill's murder.
    • Or when he kills the assembled mobsters who wanted to take part in his plan.
  • Nightmare Fuel:
    • After being thrown into Bonita's bathtub in the opening scene, Capungo tries to grab Bond's PPK, but Bond manages to counter this by tossing a plugged-in lamp in the bathtub, which barbecues him to death.
    • The fate of poor Jill Masterson, killed by Oddjob and left painted in gold for Bond to see.
    • Tilly Masterson's death. While Oddjob's hat doesn't decapitate her, it surely looks like it did.
    • Bond is strapped to a table and almost cut in half by an industrial laser with seemingly no hope of escape. By the time Bond convinces Goldfinger to stop the laser, it has almost reached his crotch.
    • Goldfinger's plan? Murdering a whole army with a Deadly Gas and blowing Fort Knox up with a nuclear bomb. With no regards for how many lives it will destroy in the process, nor for the economic crisis it will cause.
    • Having explained his plan to his backers, Goldfinger locks them in a room and has them murdered via poison gas. What makes it more disturbing is that it's reminiscent of the Nazis' methods.
    • Oddjob kills Mr. Solo and leaves his body in the car. The car is then dropped into a junkyard grinder.
    • Bond defuses the atomic bomb mere seconds before detonation.
  • Older Than They Think: By a hair. While not as snarky as in the movie, in the novel, Bond does predict that even if Goldfinger's plan "works", the best-case scenario will see him "tearing down the Dixie Highway in a truck with a few gold bars loaded with gamma rays and the American Army on your tail. And you'll have killed sixty thousand people for that? The thing's farcical. Even if you do get a ton or two away, where the hell do you think you'll hide it?".
  • One-Scene Wonder:
    • Jill Masterson has 5 minutes of screentime, but due to her iconic death scene, she is one of the most well-remembered characters from the entire franchise.
    • The old lady who suddenly pulls out an MP40 and shoots at Bond's Aston Martin when he escapes from Goldfinger's henchmen may also count.
  • Sequel Displacement: Many people start the Bond series with this one. Or think this is the best, among 24.
  • Seinfeld Is Unfunny: Introduced so many tropes to the Bond films that are now a standard, that younger viewers will be wondering what the big deal is.
  • Signature Scene:
    • Alongside the legendary groin laser, Jill Masterson's gold-painted corpse is one of the most iconic images in the film, if not the entire franchise.
    • The golf game that climaxes with Oddjob decapitating a statue with his razor-rimmed hat.
    • Bond removing his diving suit to reveal an immaculate white dinner jacket, complete with carnation.
  • Special Effect Failure:
    • It's far too obvious that the plane crashing at the end is a model.
    • Subverted during the gassing of Fort Knox, the soldiers don't "die" convincingly — all of them clearly take the time to lie down comfortably rather than reacting the way people would really react to poison gas. Additionally, one soldier can be seen tapping another on the arm as they miss their cue to drop to the ground, while others miss it completely and are still standing while everyone else around them collapses. The DVD Commentary reveals that this was deliberately done to hint to viewers that the gas isn't real and that the men are faking their reactions to it. This might have also been more clear had a Deleted Scene been kept that would have clearly indicated that the soldiers were going to fake it.
    • When the car containing Solo's body is lifted into the crusher, we can see directly into the backseat and there is no sign of Solo's body being in there.
    • In the scene where Oddjob knocks the head off a statue with his hat, the severed head bounces off its arm, which visibly gives way, revealing the statue to be fake.
    • There's a very noticeable edit to replace Connery with a stuntman when Pussy grabs his legs and causes him to fall hard onto the duct.
  • Tear Jerker: The deaths of the Masterton sisters.
    • Jill gets killed for betraying Goldfinger. Bond finds her coated head-to-toe in toxic gold paint.
    • Tilly gets her neck broken by Oddjob's hat. Bond has a few seconds of grief over her body, taking her hand, before Oddjob and the Chinese mooks take him away.
  • Uncanny Valley: Goldfinger in the book. However, the effect comes across from the odd combination of his appearance and his dress sense: in the golf scene, Bond notes that Goldfinger looks like he went to a costume designer and asked "what do people wear when they go to play golf?". The result was unsettling to look at because it didn't look natural at all.
  • Values Dissonance:
    • James forcing a kiss on Pussy Galore and her falling into his arms is often misconstrued as "Rape as Love" rather the aggressive courting it was meant to be. It's worse in the book, where he literally bangs the gay out of her, though the encounter is more (for lack of a better term) consensual there and only happens at the very end. Although the book makes it clear that Pussy was already attracted to Bond by then, Bond using "Tender Loving Care" as a euphemism for what he's about to do is very creepy, due to the fact that his next actions are pretty much the opposite of TLC.
    • Auric's opinion on Koreans: "The cruelest people in the world." Actually downplayed from the novel, where it is made clear Bond agrees with him and thinks Goldfinger is absolutely right, making a point of calling Oddjob an "ape" repeatedly and thinking that Koreans are lower than apes for some reason. The film at least allows you to rationalize it as Auric's racism alone.
  • What Do You Mean It's Not for Kids?: There have been many stories about people who watched this film as kids. A film that includes Bond finding a dead, naked girl that he slept with earlier, and her sister later having her neck broken by Oddjob's hat. Though 11-year-old Pierce Brosnan didn't mind too much, starting a lifelong love for the franchise and ultimately playing the role himself.
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