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  • Sign your entries.
  • One moment per movie to a troper, if multiple entries are signed to the same troper the more recent one will be cut.
  • Moments only, no "just everything he said," or "The entire movie," entries.
  • No contesting entries. This is subjective, the entry is their opinion.
  • No natter. As above, anything contesting an entry will be cut, and anything that's just contributing more can be made its own entry.
  • Explain why it's a Dethroning Moment Of Suck.
  • No Real Life examples, including Executive Meddling. That is just asking for trouble.
  • No ASSCAPS, no bold, and no italics unless it's the title of a work. We are not yelling the DMoSs out loud.

  • Terlwyth: I never liked the idea of a campy reboot because Batman Returns didn't make enough money, but I was hoping it'd be decent. That however was instantly not the case when the Graysons decide to dispose of the bomb (which looks stupid) Two Face planted themselves instead of fleeing and getting proper authorities. There are other problems I have with this scene,but I'll skip to the death. So basically Two-Face shoots wildly and happens to cut the ropes The Graysons are on (except Dick) and they plummet to their deaths in what appears to be a little too peaceful while Two-Face conveniently finds a trap door to escape and then there wasn't a funeral and they weren't referenced next film. What?
    • Spidey Terry: Batman Forever as a whole was lacking, but the introduction of Robin to the series is a real DMOS. It doesn't work because we don't get a ten-year-old Dick Grayson grieving over his parents (who were killed mid-act simply for being in the wrong place at the wrong time) and having nowhere else to turn but a sympathetic Bruce Wayne. The movie essentially uses the Broad Strokes of this origin (though throws Two-Face into the mix and makes the parents chronic heroes with deaths boarding on Senseless Sacrifice), but utilizes a young adult Dick Grayson. Bruce naturally feels sympathy for a fellow orphan, but it doesn't ring nearly as true as it does in the comics because of Dick being aged up. Dick in this movie is perfectly capable of living on his own. This sizable lapse in story and logic just kept nagging me for the rest of the movie. It's Plot Induced Stupidity just to get him to Wayne Manor and as the comics long-since demonstrated, it wasn't even necessary! Frankly, Dick comes across as a sponge that lucked into a big meal ticket rather than a grieving would-be hero wanting to make things right.
    • Animeking1108: The end of Batman Begins. Not only does Scarecrow get the short end of the stick (despite being advertised as the Big Bad), but Ra's Al Ghul was defeated in the most anti-climactic way possible. Basically, the bridge on the train went out, and Batman just left Ra's for dead. Okay, Batman has killed in both the movies and the early comics before, but "I'm not going to kill you, but I don't have to save you" was such a gigantic Writer Cop Out. Especially considering he still technically killed him. At least in The Dark Knight, Two-Face's death was somewhat accidental.
  • Leaven: In the movie 40 Days and 40 Nights, Nicole, Matt's ex-girlfriend, wants to stop Matt from completing his vow to abstain from sex for Lent. Her reason for doing this is to win the prize money that has collecting from people betting on whether Matt will complete his vow. So, Nicole goes to Matt's apartment where he has chained himself to the bed in order to ensure that he completes his vow, and rapes him. That's bad, but what makes this movies even worse is Erica, his current girlfriend, comes into the room and assumes he cheated on her. So, he has to apologize to her for being raped! Nicole wins the prize money and gets away with her crime. What the fuck were the writers thinking?
  • CAD: There is one scene in the Doom movie which stands out for how atrociously bad it is. In the final fight scene, The Rock breaks off a metal wire and wraps it around his arm. This is how the movie nods to the Cyberdemon.
  • Korval: The Eragon movie has one. Anyway, Eragon has a dream about Arya, a woman he's only ever heard of by this point and one he first met in a dream. She's being tortured. So naturally, he wakes up and wants to rescue her. Then, Jeremy Irons as Brom uses his acting talent to its fullest (well, the fullest that the writing lets him) to try to convince Eragon not to go off half-cocked, to act responsibly and so forth. Irons' performance gives you a real sense of the urgency in Eragon not doing this. And then Eragon says, "Your shame is not mine!" At this point, liking Eragon (the character) has been rendered 100% impossible. It's like crossing the Moral Event Horizon, only without having to actually kill anyone. It would have been much more acceptable if Irons hadn't been so damned convincing in his performance, because Eragon's blowing him off so easily and so harshly just makes you want to reach through the screen and choke the shit out of him.
    • Sick Brit Kid: There's a reason even fans of the book series hate this movie. Whereas a lot of Eragon's deplorable acts in the book series can be Handwaved by the fact that he's got a lot of pressure and has to make REALLY tough decisions...the movie basically justified ALL of the Hatedom's hatred for the book series by stripping away all of the depth of the main character, instead turning him into a pretentious...what's the word.
    • User:Jonn: Mine was when Brom asks Eragon how old he is--"15? 16?" And our hero retorts "seven...teen!" in a terribly acted manner. Why did they hire this kid?
    • Stele Resolve: I hated pretty much the entire movie, but if I had to choose one thing, it would be the hatching. The book has a cool series of events where Sapphira hatches from the egg, and Eragon is forced to hide her and care for her in secret, slowly raising her from infancy to something approximating adolescence, and even having to find an appropriate name for her. He does everything from feeding her to teaching her to associate human words with objects around her. In the movie? She hatches, and in a magical moment flies off and turns into an adult dragon, complete with an understanding of human language and a fully developed mind! Presto, no character development needed, just add Narm!
  • Peteman: In Serenity, when we find out just how deep the corruption and particularly the incompetence runs in the Alliance, and given how tired and overused that theme is in Joss Whedon franchises, I felt like he was reaching out of the screen to insult me personally.
    • ondarisa: For me, it was the scene where the crew returns to Haven to find it wiped out. Mal orders the crew to cover his ship with the blood and corpses of their dead friends, and he'll kill anyone who dares to confront him about it. Particularly jarring when in the next scene he shrugs off the Operative's Not So Different speech with "I don't kill children"...he just threatens to kill the people he thinks of that way. I simply couldn't view him as a hero after that.
    • Allronix: "A leaf on the wind..." CRASH! THUD! C'mon, Joss. That was totally pointless, didn't advance the plot, had no impact on the rest of the plotline events, and was a bit of cheap shock by reverting to your usual cliche of killing off a character just to invoke the Anyone Can Die trope. At least Book got to take down the sons of a bitch in that cruiser! But this just proves that Joss can't tie his shoes without some cheap character death.
  • Slowzombie: Repo! The Genetic Opera, the scene where Shilo stands up to her father for the first time. Not a bad moment in itself, but the song that follows is not at all pleasant. For one, it feels out of place, with a sudden swerve from the established "we sing to talk"-style to the more music video-like "band and dancers out of nowhere"-style. In addition, it is a little... creepy.

  Now, I'm sure there's a perfectly good reason why they would stop their 'serious' musical to include a 'rocking' teen rebellion song that has nothing to do with padding the soundtrack, but whatever it is, this song is just awful, so much so that TV Tropes, which is run by people who like everything, lists this scene as Repo' Dethroning Moment of Suck.

  • Enchanter 468: During the Starship Troopers movie, the Roughnecks are heading through a canyon and one of them is snatched by a huge, flying pseudo-arachnid, which proceeds to land on a ledge and begins to torture the man with its stinger and bladed limbs. Lieutenant Rasczak calls for Sugar Watkins (another soldier) to toss him a specialized sniper rifle. He zooms in on the bug and its prisoner, and I'm expecting some kind of Crowning Moment of Awesome where Rasczak snipes the Bug, but instead he shoots the wounded man (the one who had been screaming for help) through the heart...and lets the Bug get away. The Mercy Kill might be justifiable, but would it bother you too much to shoot the damn thing rather than letting it fly off to tell all its friends where all the tasty humans are?
    • Garm: What makes it even worse, is that he had plenty of time to shoot the bug before it started ripping the soldier apart, but he just watches through the scope as it rips into him, and then kills him. Also, why did Razak demand that they kill him after he lost his legs, when the rescue ship was right there? Remember how when the characters first go to enlist, the recruiter has fully-functioning robotic legs, payed for by the military...?
    • Azzizzi: Yeah, this is kind of a poor ripoff of a similar scene in The Sand Pebbles where it makes sense when Jake Holman (played by Steve McQueen) wants to shoot the Chinese who are torturing his helper, Po-han (played by Mako). The ship's captain orders Holman not to shoot at the Chinese because it will start a war. Holman shoots Po-han to put him out of his misery.
    • Galahad PC: While so much of the movie is blissfully stupid and enjoyable if you don't think too hard... try watching it with the commentary by Verhoeven and the writer. Many delightful moments include explaining how the actors aren't really in orbit around Jupiter (that's just a special effect, you see), constantly changing gears on what the movie was trying to be about, talking about how faithful they were to the "message" of the original book, and Verhoeven getting the point of one scene completely backwards until he was given a reminder. That stuff is just plain hilarious to listen to. No, the mind-boggling self-dethroning comes when they start talking about Carmen. It turns out that Carmen tested really badly in test audiences in every single demographic, everywhere in the world. Verhoeven's response? Clearly, the entire world just isn't ready for a strong and intelligent woman, who apparently never existed in fiction until 1997. Even better, they try to take credit for creating everything about her, when she was already a smart, talented and combat-tested pilot in the original book.
    • Snarf: Specifically, the original book makes a point of mentioning that women were more talented than men at space piloting (going into detail about reflexes, stamina, emotional stability, etc.) and only the very brightest people of either gender get into that particular assignment. Verhoeven, et.al. apparently didn't read thoroughly enough and want to blame the source material rather than their own casting decisions. Although there is a certain amount of Fridge Brilliance to not shooting the flying Bug--such lapses in judgement do explain why the humans appear to be losing the war rather badly.
  • Enchanter 468: I would like to submit Jurassic Park III, specifically, the moment where the a Spinosaurus mauls a T-Rex. I understand Spinosaurus was slightly larger, but just think about this for a moment. The T-Rex opens the fight by running up and chomping on the Spinosaur's neck, and it only inflicts some superficial cuts!? Those things' teeth were serrated and rounded in cross section to sustain greater bite force, and fossils of their victims show that those teeth could cut right through skin and muscle and punch big fracking holes in the bones. Couple that with the dinosaur's massive jaw pressure, and that first neck chomp should have crippled the Spinosaurus for life, if not killed it outright.
    • Baronobeefdip: Agreed. The whole "Spino VS. T. rex" battle was little more than for Jack Horner (the Paleontologist who helped with the so-called "accuracy" of the dinosaurs in the films) to show off his dubious "Tyrannosaurus was a scavenger" hypothesis. Apparently, the filmmakers (and Horner himself) have forgotten that there's (though limited) fossil evidence that T. rex was a social animal (It may have lived in small family groups)... which means that Spinosaurus would've had to deal with not just one Tyrannosaurus but several. All these inaccuracies just makes the "T. rex VS Spino" scene all the more a DMOS.
    • Hayleychaotix: Two moments from Jurassic Park II. First off is the good guys setting all the captured dinosuars free, which results in them running through the bad guy's camp destroying everything, including vehicles, and their communication devices. They conviently ignore the fact that the dinosuars are the bad guy's property, and they're completely unnatural creatures so their nature related excuses fall though. Then we have Sarah, the animal expert and Nick taking an injured baby T-rex back to their camp to heal its leg. The parent T-rexes then attack their base, killing the only guy who wasn't being an idiot in the situation, and wrecking their equipment. These are in no way the worst scenes in the movie, but they're the dethroning moments because they set off all the unnessecary death, destruction, and stupidity in the rest of the film.
  • Danny Lilithborne: Lady in the Water was treading water, but I was along for the ride for awhile. I could even tolerate the director being a main character in the story. But then... a kid reads plot-oriented messages from the backs of cereal boxes. Judging from the expression on the faces of everyone I saw leave the theater, I think the cheated feeling was mutual.
  • X 2 X: In The Village, yet another M. Night Shyamalan classic, we had the obligatory Twist Ending. The eponymous village is not set in 1897, but was actually founded during in the late 1970s and is essentially a human wildlife reserve/science observatory plant. The female lead learns this when one member of the community falls ill and requires medical aid that is only found in the modern-day society. Was that even intended as a Tomato Surprise?! Even worse, the plot revolving around the seemingly-supernatural village and the monsters that lied just outside was actually shaping up into a viable and compelling story. Fittingly enough, this movie is almost unanimously hailed as the point where his movies were thrust into third gear... right into the realm of suck. What a tweeeest, indeed.
  • Crazyrabbits: The "dance scene" in Memoirs of a Geisha, where the newly-minted geisha Sayuri (Zhang Ziyi) performs a dance amid a blanket of fake snow onstage...the only problem is that it's not a dance, despite what the characters claim. Sayuri walks onto the stage in six-inch platform shoes, waves her umbrella around for a few moments and jumps around acting spastically for a few seconds. She dances for less than two minutes. Yet, everyone thinks this is good enough to give her a standing ovation. Putting aside all the other problems with the film (slow pacing, unlikable characters, cultural inaccuracies), the dance scene proves that Hollywood didn't understand the concept of a geisha at all.
  • Enchanter 468: The scene in the Wing Commander movie where the Tiger Claw has to hide in an asteroid crater to avoid a Kilrathi ship, and everyone aboard the Tiger Claw has to be very, very quiet so that the other spaceship doesn't hear' them! You know, I'm okay with sound in space; I don't go after Armageddon or Star Wars or Star Trek for it, but when a movie flat out states that not only can the audience hear the sound in space, but so can the characters, that is freaking pushing it.
  • Igordebraga: The ending of The Departed. Kill'Em All is not always the answer! Of all the people I know, only one didn't hate all those meaningless and anticlimactic deaths! (for the troper himself, the one for Memento too - though in a different way: The Departed, he wasn't liking it and the ending capped it off; Memento, it was going well, then it ends with something that takes all the sense away, and made him hate the movie)
  • baronobeefdip: I find Godzilla:Final Wars to be a Guilty Pleasure for the most part, but I find there's one glaring DMOS going agaisnt it. What is it, you ask? It's during the final battle when Monster X transforms into Keizer Ghidorah. What? Ok, Toho, I can forgive the ridiculously short "Godzilla VS (Insert monster here)" battles. I can forgive the silly Matrix/X-Men/Star Wars inspired "human vs alien" plot. I can forgive that the "Mothra VS Gigan" plot point lead to nothing but a rather pointless cameo by Kamikaze Mothra at the end. What I can't forgive however, is that you turned what was an exciting battle between Godzilla and a new foe into yet another Godzilla VS Ghidorah battle. Yes, Toho you made me lose interest at the climax of the film due to turning an original fight into a cliched one.
  • Rick Havoc: Star Trek Insurrection is almost entirely made of suck, but the moment that stands out for me is when Riker flies the Enterprise through some gaseous Phlebotinum... with a manual steering column joystick that magically emerges from the deck of the bridge and does nothing that the helm console itself isn't designed to do.
  • Hoodiecrow: Saving Private Ryan, "James, earn this." Um, you know, Ryan hadn't exactly asked for any of this as a personal favor. The boy simply wanted to do his duty, and did so gallantly to the end; how can he be in your debt? The film should have been named Condemning Private Ryan to a Lifetime of Regret and Guilt instead.
  • Trombone Child: I didn't feel this way initially, but the more I think about it, I think that Dropping an Air Conditioner on the van in The a Team movie might be this, especially since B. A. didn't rebuild it during the course of the film. What was the point of introducing it, then, and why would the writers want to destroy something so iconic?
  • One In Twenty: Though most people would consider the movie Dungeons and Dragons in its entirety to be a DMOS for the Pencil and Paper RPG industry, Wizards of the Coast, Hollywood, and anything that does not repress its existence like the movie is Lovecraft's Dagon, one true moment of Wall Banger is when Elwood (the Dwarf, I don't think his name is actually said in the movie though) rants for about five minutes about how Snails should hook up with a dwarf instead of an elf. Not only is this breaking his character as a character that almost never speaks, breaking WSOD about any and all interpretations of dwarf behavior, as well as the commonly cited understanding that dwarfs and humans are incompatible on a biological, social, behavioral and any other level of intimate interaction.
    • Man Called True: The scene where they distract a beholder with a tossed pebble. A beholder... falling for a tossed pebble. Beholders have genius-level Intelligence (18 as a racial average, the maximum for a starting character in 3rd Edition), are master magicians, and - oh yeah - have independantly-moving eyestalks. Any beholder worth its copper pieces would have followed the pebble with one eye and wiped out the heroes with all the others. If you're going to use an iconic D&D monster, don't just throw it in and then treat it like Standard Cliche Hollywood Guard #221.
  • Korval: Star Trek 2009. The entire Kobayashi Maru scene. No one part can be singled out for idiocy, because the whole thing is a black hole of stupid. Kirk is a monumental jackass throughout the entire thing. Nobody in the simulation takes it seriously. Kirk's cheating is blatantly obvious, yet when asked, Spock is unable to explain why Kirk could win. And there's a completely pointless Mythology Gag with the apple, which exists primarily to remind the audience of a much better movie they could be watching. It's just complete monumental fail on pretty much every level.
    • Pumbelo: I second that. What made it worse was that they even fucked up the entire point of that test: it's to experience a situation where you can't possibly win. In the movie, they say it's to experience fear - despite the fact that no one in the situation is acting accordingly. No one takes it seriously even in universe!
    • Anarquistador: One thing that really needled me was the identification of the enemy as "Klingon Warbirds." Dammit, man! Klingons don't use Warbirds! Romulans use Warbirds! Am I being a needlessly pedantic nerd? Well, maybe. But it would have been just as easy to get that detail right, and not doing so seems like another indicator that the whole scene was just a Mythology Gag.
    • sephiroth 144 That the test overseers wouldn't be doing some serious checking with the jerkassing is a question, but I could let that roll. For me, it was the promotion of Kirk at the end. Even allowing all the Plot Induced Stupidity to get to that point, (especially that there was apparently one non-cadet on the entire frakking ship), jumping someone at least 7 grades in authority because he did (exceptionally) well in one crisis is utter insanity. Kirk not only earned the animosity of everyone else in Starfleet, (especially career military who are now his subordinates, some of whom were literally in the service while he was in diapers), he has NO idea how to do anything except, MAYBE, handle a crisis. How is he going to file officer evaluation reports for his lieutenants, deal with transfer requests, supply issues, etc- the day to day minutae of being a (naval) captain? I seriously hope the next movie opens with the Enterprise being the biggest joke in the fleet with Kirk's utter incompetence blazing through.
    • Snarf: the whole promotion scenario is a slap in the face not only to the veteran Starfleet officers, but also to the people to whom Kirk owes his life--Chekov (with the transporter), Sulu (by having that sword handy), and especially Scotty (without whom Kirk would likely have remained marooned on Delta Vega, as the Federation didn't know about Spock Prime and with Nero's ongoing rampage they weren't likely to go checking on a minor outpost anytime soon.) All they get is all Kirk should have gotten: their commissions (or, in Scotty's case, off the shitlist) and the heartfelt thanks of the Federation. In fact, Scotty should be most resentful of all. Spock has dumped an unruly cadet in his lap without warning or explanation, and did not have the courtesy to at least send along extra supplies, forcing Scotty to share his already limited food supply with someone whom he basically has to place under arrest. To top it off, this same insubordinate cadet is then promoted past Scotty, who already was a commissioned officer and who was grounded for doing his job. Keep in mind Kirk was earlier caught spying on Uhura in her dorm room, an offense that in the 21st century military would have seen him court-martialed, sent to the brig, and dishonorably discharged no matter what else he might have done.
    • Kendo_Bunny: Dethroning Moment of Suck for this sword-fighting troper when Sulu explained he had been trained in fencing, and then swung his sword around like he was trying to hit a pinata. The basics of Western-style fencing are easily learned, and even granted that combat fencing is different, and granting that kendo is very different and that his style might have been affected by kendo training, nothing Sulu did on that platform suggested he had ever held a sword in his life, let alone been highly trained.
  • Cannotrememberpasswords: This troper understands that Revenge of the Fallen is meant to be a big dumb action flick. However, after running it over in his mind, he found one scene that is emblematic of why that film is still totally inexcusable: Devastator. Yes, he looked cool, and he was pretty well designed, and he was built up fairly well, but what does he do in the movie? (1) Get his ass kicked (by Skids and Mudflap, of all bots). Mudflap clawing his way out of Devastator's gullet doesn't redeem Mudflap for being so Primus-damned annoying as was intended. It robs Devastator of any actual threatening potential and gives us more scenes with Mudflap, whom the audience has now realized is invincible. (2) Rip up the top of a pyramid. When half the cast are twenty-foot robots, that's really not very impressive. In the first movie, Optimus was gouging foot-deep holes in concrete with every step and crashing through skyscrapers while fighting Megatron, and Bumblebee destroys a house as collateral damage in the opening. Any single one of the characters could have smashed the pyramid into sand by accident, making Devastator completely pointless. (3) Get killed in one shot by a railgun. Not only is it more evidence of the absurd hoo-rah military worship the movies exhibit, it comes as a detriment to the story, as it makes his death anticlimactic. Why have all the Autobots team up to kill him, when you could have a Deus Ex Machina, never mentioned prior, never again used, destroy him in one single blast? "Join the army! We rob any excitement from a movie, because apparently we fight giant alien robots better than their millenia-old sworn adversaries!" (4) Oh, yeah, and they gave him testicles.
    • User:So We Ate Them: In a film full of grating, poorly-handled dick jokes, the treatment of Devastator gives a new meaning to "new low." The Big Bad has testes. And that's the joke. Yet they still felt compelled to explain it.
    • Philipnova 798 If I had to choose one moment, I have to go with the entire desert fight. Aside from Bumblebee kicking both Rampage and Ravage's asses. The entire thing was just a poorly edited mass of military, sand, explosions, bad comedy and poorly done CGI. But what really drives my hatred for this is the ending. As we all know The Fallen has succeeded in his plan and is about exterminate the sun. All the while giving out Laser-Guided Karma to the military trying to stop it. Only to have Optimus Prime destroy the Harvester and kill The Fallen in what has to be the worst one-sided fight in history. Compounded by The Fallen not even attempting to fight back and the lackluster CG that looks more like Transmorphers than a $200 million movie. Also, what the hell was Michael Bay thinking by including the Cybertronion version of Heaven?
  • LWS: Dark of the Moon does this as well, in a particularly infuriating manner. Noteworthy portions of the Decepticon cast were killed off by humans. "Kudos" to the pathetic excuse of a death they gave Starscream--at the hands of Sam Witwicky.
    • Regu 14: At least they all went out fighting. This troper was was absolutely pissed when Ironhide was given a sudden, pointless death. After the second film moved him into the back seat, we see him do something badass when he saves Sam and Bumblebee, He's then unceremoniously killed off by Sentienal with a cheap shot to the back. The worst part is the fact that Ironhide doesn't even get the chance to fight back and he justs rusts away. I'm not a fan of Ironhide, but that scene offended me as it was a great dis-service to his character and no one, I repeat, no one gives two shits about it.
    • Darth Megatron: Megatron's death. Sure he was injured and all, but his appearance in Dark Of The Moon showed him to be the Anticlimax Boss of Anticlimax Bosses. It provided a particularly embarrassing example of Badass Decay for the alleged Big Bad of the entire Transformers brand when we could have had a climactic, spectacular final battle between the Big Good, his arch-enemy, and the new Bigger Bad who happens to be equal in power and wisdom to the other two - this would have provided a satisfying ending to an otherwise brilliantly-executed hour-long exhilarating nonstop series of action sequences. Whatever happened to the humongous mechanical monster who handed Optimus' ass to him in the first film, not to mention in other continuities?
    • Blueshark: I Really liked DOTM but Que/Wheeljack's stands out to me. It just felt that the writers thought they needed another Autobot death so they wrote it in a hurry. Not the worst but still it felt lazy.
  • Lex Logic: The scene from the first Transformers film where Bumblebee transforms himself from a careworn '76 Camaro into a brand-spanking new 2007 model. Discarding a classic with lots of both innate and potential value as a worthless piece of crap in favor of a new model whose value has nowhere to go but down simply because it's "shinier" is something only a moron would do. It does make for one hell of an inintentional metaphor for the filmmaker's approach to the franchise, though.
  • User:Mac Phisto: Halloween Resurrection -- aside from one of the worst Ass Pulls ever in order to bring Michael back, at the climax this formerly unstoppable monster gets his ass kicked by Busta Rhymes! Who was imitating moves he saw in a Bruce Lee movie!
    • Spidey Terry: What I found so irritating is that they killed off Laurie in the opening minutes and left it at that. Now, that was a really good sequence, but what's next? Tracking down Laurie's son, the apparently last living relative? You'd think so since Michael's M.O. is going after his relatives. However, instead, he goes home and essentially plays janitor in his home. Eesh. The basic plot could've made a decent horror flick, but no way this should've been the direction for a Halloween movie. Eesh, if they were gonna bring back Michael, they should've gone all out - not just inserted him into a plot that could've been anyone else's.
      • Zuul MF: The idea is that he has finished his task after killing Laurie and is sort of just laying low in some weird kind of retirement until the kids come and bother him. That's right: they ended the series at the beginning of the movie, not the end. And Laurie's stupidity was such an Out-of-Character Moment. I believe one reviewer whose name escapes me put it that it's like beginning Moby Dick with: "Call me Ishmael. We caught the whale."
  • Stele Resolve: Funny Games. Psychotic couple of creeps holds family hostage, plays mind games with them, yada yada yada. The only thing that made this movie different from most others like it is how real the emotions of the characters seemed, and how one of the villains routinely broke the 4th wall. So the mom finally demonstrates a crowning moment of awesome when she grabs the elephant rifle that the villains carelessly left lying around and blows one's guts all over the wall. Then the movie erases this and turns everything following it into a dethroning moment of suck when Paul grabs a TV remote control, rewinds the movie, and prevents her from getting the gun.
  • De Luman: Law Abiding Citizen at the very end of the movie, the character Clyde, who had been shown to be a Magnificent Bastard par excellance, makes stupid mistake after stupid mistake in order to let the DA Nick, figure out how to stop him. Not only this, but the movie tries to turn the phrase "Fuck his civil rights" into a CMOA.
  • Valkir: That fucking stupid "Chaos Reigns" fox in Antichrist. The movie was slow, dull, and by-the-numbers "humans suck and our director is depressed" nonsense up to then, which was not awful, but that completely ridiculous and jarringly awful moment of Narm fully established that it was all a bunch of artsy pretension disguising a really basic and unremarkable film with some handwave explanation misogyny thrown in.
    • Devoured By Robots: God, I didn't even manage to make it seconds before my dethroning moment, which was the baby clearly committing merciful suicide to escape its completely unlikeable parents having graphic sex in the bathroom to opera in pretentious black-and-white slow-motion. The rest of the film was like a Dragging Footnote of Suck to compliment the opening sequence.
  • Stele Resolve: Hellbound: Hellraiser II was a kind of pointless and confusing sequel to the first movie, but it was interesting at the very least for most of the movie, and Pinhead and the other Cenobites reprised their roles as badass villains. Then the Smug Snake doctor is lured into a trap and subjected to horrible torture within the realm of the Cenobites (really should have seen that coming, he literally walked into it). Fine and dandy. A little later, though, he returns transformed into a Cenobite. Okay. Then a giant phallic tentacle attaches itself to his head and carries him around. What. He immediately proceeds to chew the scenery of the rest of the movie with corny Pre Mortem One Liners like "The doctor is in" and "I recommend...amputation!" As if that wasn't bad enough to ruin the movie, the true Dethroning Moment of Suck occurs when the original Cenobites not only renounce their roles as badass villains, but promptly get slaughtered like cattle by the most cliched and hammy Big Bad the horror genre has ever seen. Congratulations, you've successfully stripped this movie of everything that kept it from completely sucking.
  • Stele Resolve: I wasn't greatly impressed with Black Christmas (the original); it was rather dull, predictable, and the character stupid. But the unforgivably moronic moment came at the very end, with the police burst into the sorority house to find the supposed killer dead at the hands of the last survivor, Hussey's character. So they haul his body off and talk about what a horrible event this has been...and then they just leave. Yeah, that girl's been through some pretty severe trauma and shock, but I'm sure leaving her alone in the very house where the source of her trauma occurred, without so much as a single cop or doctor to watch over her, is a perfectly sound idea.
    • timotaka: Same here, but I would also like to add one more Wall Banger: the ending shows undiscovered corpses in the attic of the house, implying that the police don't even bother searching through the house to find people who are still missing!
    • Lord Crayak: There was one cop shown guarding the front door as the credits roll...a seemingly lone guard doesn't make things any less of a Wall Banger, though.
  • Dan Dan Noodles: The Rock was a silly movie start to end, which, OK, don't expect subtlety and nuance from Michael Bay. But one scene in particular is so egregriously dumb that it turned me into a bad theater neighbor, as I was compelled to say, out loud, "Oh, come on!" -- when Mason cuts through a plate glass window with... a quarter. Not a special diamond-edged, super-secret spy window-cutter cleverly designed as a quarter, mind you. A plain old quarter, straight out of his pocket. Seriously, they aren't even trying at that point, just seeing how much they can put over on moviegoers so long as they sandwich it between lots of shiny lights and explosions.
    • pvtnum 11: Possibly handwaved; I recall Mason slams the metal chair leg onto the quarter before picking it up, and that might have put a sharp edge on the quarter. Maybe. My DMOS on that movie was having every single SEAL getting waxed by the wayward Marines. Yeah, okay, high-ground and all that, but really?
  • Stele Resolve: Sleepaway Camp was a pretty ridiculous movie, a cheap cash in on the then-popular slasher franchise. It's not a very good movie, poorly acted, whatever. The real Wall Banger, the unforgivable moment of stupidity, is when Angela, the most likely killer, turns out to be the killer. Why is that such a big deal? Because the movie clearly makes an effort to disguise the killer's identity until the very end, but does such a poor job that a child could call it from the half-hour mark. Seriously, it was so obvious that the creepy, thousand-yard-stare psycho girl is the killer that throughout the entire movie, I kept turning to my roommate and saying "There's no way it's her. It's so obvious that it's her that it has to be someone else." Guess what? It was.
  • Stele Resolve: Dogma was an all around hilarious movie, almost perfect. The one small thing keeping it from being a golden movie? The shit demon. Goddamn it, that was so unforgivably stupid. I mean, an extended toilet humor joke? Really? And the rest of the movie was laden with insightful and biting wit...
  • bobdrantz: While the remake of Godzilla was an awful movie all around, the absolute worst moment of the film was when Dr. Tatapolous finds out that the titular monster is pregnant. ...You mean to tell me that Dean Devlin and Roland Emmerich actually thought that would be a good idea to turn what originally was a walking allegory of the atomic bomb into a freakin' pregnant iguana!? Congratulations, Devlin and Emmerich. You managed to take one of the most iconic movie characters of all time and turned him into a sick joke (And not the funny kind either.)
    • fluffything: The fact that Zilla was killed by freakin' missiles is what made me say "Fuck this movie". What's worse is how he's killed by missiles. He doesn't go down fighting like King Kong or his far-better Japanese counterpart. Oh, no. Instead, he gets tangeld up in the wires of the Brooklyn Bridge (Which by the way, is a suspension bridge and should've collapsed when the wires snapped) while the Air Force pretty much blast the shit out of him. That's right, the film pretty much turns the climax into an inverse Curb Stomp Battle in which the giant monster is the one who gets pwned. This and the previously mentioned "Pregnant Iguana" aspect of the movie are why GINO is the ultimate example of character rape in any film. This movie doesn't deserve to be called "Godzilla" by any stretch of the imagination.
  • Ellytoad: In Star Trek V the Final Frontier, Sybok's coolness level drops 50% when he lectures Kirk on how humans overcame their misconceptions: "The people of your planet once believed their world was flat... Columbus proved it was round."
  • Tropers/GREGOLE: While Alien vs. Predator: Requiem was already an unsatisfying film, the moment that really sold it for me was the bit where the predalien infects an entire room full of pregnant women. While the little kid being chestbursted earlier was cringe-inducing, it was one death out of countless. We're shown that both monsters are ruthless and inhuman, and will not make distinctions between their victims... The filmmakers apparently felt that we forgot about this, so they decided to go even more over the top, to the point where the shock is gone, and it becomes a sick snuff fantasy for the writers. It was the single most tasteless thing I have ever seen in a movie since the Toxic Avenger disemboweled a man dressed as a baby who was trying to blow up a school for the retarded on Take A Mexican To Lunch Day.
    • Crazyrabbits: The "romantic" subplot in the film is quite possibly the most juvenile thing in the entire Alien/Predator canon. A large part of the film is devoted to lead character Dallas' younger brother, who works as a pizza delivery boy and has feelings for a cheerleader whose Jerk Jock boyfriend throws his car keys into the sewer. It's like Dawson's Creek in a sci-fi film, and features the most painfully bad dialogue in the film ("Are you looking at the clock, or are you looking at me?") Worse yet, this storyline continues far past the point viewers are expected to care about it - the boy to win her affections in the midst of xenomorphs and Scar mysteriously killing off all the residents, it just gets in the way of the main plot and adds nothing whatsoever to the film.
  • Enchanter 468: I liked Avatar. I really did, so don't think I'm attacking the whole movie. That said, one scene makes me freaking furious. Jake goes to speak to the Genius Loci, and tells it to look into Grace's memories, to "see the world we came from" "Ah,", I thought, "So Cameron's doing Humanity on Trial, which means Jake will ask Eywa to see the good things about humanity, to understand that not all Humans Are Bastards, and that we can coexist. James Cameron is a smart director, surely he'll balance this." Well, nope, turns out he says [[spoiler: "there's no green on our planet. We destroyed it; we killed our mother, and we'll do the same thing here." He then calls for the entire planet to fight against the humans. So not only are we bastards, we're soul-deprived planet-looters who just go around raping every ecosystem we come across, coexistence is impossible and the superior Na'vi are just going to have to kill us. What the fuck, Cameron?
    • sephiroth 144: In Avatar, what happens when Jake goes to tell the Na'vi what the Skypeople. "Hey, we want a certain rock that's under your tree" And they couldn't slant-mine? Etc... He never did his damn job, and essentially caused both sides of the slaughter that occurred.
    • Daedalis: The moment the commander in his shiny battlemech pulls a knife in smackdown with Sully's avatar. Supposedly someone took the time to design a mech with removable weapons (therefore susceptible to disarming), then machined a sword for it to draw in such a situation? Why not just bolt blades to the undersides of the forearms? or exposed spikes on the fists?
  • The Dog Sage: Salazar from the Day of the Dead remake, particularly his reply when asked by another soldier 'so you're making a spear?' is 'What's the matter? You see a black man with a pointed stick and it automatically gotta be a spear?' Made infuriating because, irregardless of race, what he has is, in fact, a spear. And apparently he doesn't know that the spear has been used by just about every culture since prehistory, with the bayonet turning even a modern rifle into a spear.
  • Camera Beard The Pirate: The scene in Cowboys and Aliens where the Mysterious Waif is being carried away by one of the eponymous aliens. The protagonist gives chase, and, for no reason, the alien flies into a small canyon, giving the hero ample opportunity to leap onto him and save the girl, rather than just fly away!
    • fluffything: While I enjoyed Cowboys and Aliens as a So Bad It's Good action film, there is ONE glaring problem I have with it. At one point in the film, we find out the aliens are invading the earth because they want gold. Why do they want it? Because it's valuable. That's it. I'm sorry...what? It doesn't make sense for so many reasons. First, value is subjective and you need context to explain why it's valuable. Do the aliens use gold for fuel, money, building material, food, weapons? It's never explained. Second, if the aliens want gold, why not set up a trade system instead of invading the planet? Third, it contridicts the previous scenes since it implied earlier that the aliens are harvesting humans for some reason. Fourth (and related to third), it's stated that the aliens are abducting humans to find their weakness and exploit it. (Beat) Why?! These aliens are explicitly stated to be able to blow up entire planets with ease, and are also shown to be able to steal gold with little effort and without anyone noticing. It doesn't make any sense. These aliens can easily just siphon up all of the gold, blow up the earth, and be on their merry way without anyone knowing about it until it was too late. Them kidnapping people to study their "weakness" just overly-complicated an already stupid reason for invading earth.
    • Zaothus: In addition to the above points, there's also the blatant plotholes with regard to Daniel Craig's character's amnesia. It's revealed at the end of the film that the aliens subject all of their human captives to some sort of light that erases all of their memories, albeit temporarily. The presence of such a machine is an obvious contrivance, but not in itself a DMOS. That comes when Craig's character starts to overcome the amnesia and has flashbacks to his escape from the aliens, revealing what happened to his old love interest, how he got the mysterious device on his hand - all plot points that were played up as mysteries at the start of the film. But, I reiterate, this flashback is to his escape from the aliens, which is to say, after he was exposed to the mindfuck-light. So why would he have forgotten it at the beginning of the film? I have nothing inherently against amnesia as a plot device, but this is one of the most half-baked attempts at it I've seen in a long time. Considering the extent to which the film's marketing campaign focused on the whole "mystery" side of things, you'd think at some point in quality control they might have picked up on such a gargantuan continuity error.
  • fluffything: While Return To Neverland is your typical medicore Disney-sequel, it has, in my opinion, one of the worst DMOS in animated film. Namely, they replaced Tick Tock the crocodile (My all-time favorite Disney character) with an octopus. Why? There was no need to replace the crocodile. The crocodile was a perfect foil to Captain Hook. And, this wasn't just some minor detail. The crocodile was an important plot element and character in the original story (Remember, the reason why Hook has, well, a hook, is because the crocodile ate his hand and it wants to eat the rest of him). Plus, how they replace the crocodile is also sloppy. Yes, Hook mentions that he "got rid of it", but it's never explained what happened to it. Did it die? Did Hook trick the crocodile into chasing someone else? Did the crocodile just get tired of chasing Hook? Finally, the octopus replacing the crocodile is pointless because the octopus pretty much acts the same as the crocodile for no other reason other than...um....there is no other reason! Why? Why replace such an iconic character with something that's little more than a cheap imitation?
  • Manwiththeplan: In Final Fantasy VII Advent Children, when Sephiroth has impaled Cloud's shoulder and tells him "Tell me what's most precious to you....give me the pleasure of taking it away"; Cloud has a moment of epic Heroic Resolve and ends up kicking Sephiroth's ass. Then along comes Advent Children: Complete. In order to promote...er, tie in with Crisis Core, the scene is changed so that Cloud has a Heroic BSOD reaction to Sephiroth's line instead, and then inexpicably, the ghost of Zack comes to him in a vision. Zack becomes the one to inspire Cloud into his Heroic Resolve, give him the move that defeats Sephiroth, and in response, Cloud even says "I am your living legacy". So basically, Square Enix took a great heroic moment for Cloud and turned it completely into a heroic moment for Zack. It's Zack who's the real hero, Cloud wouldn't have won without Zack's ghostly pep-talk, Cloud is just carrying out Zack's will and legacy. Yeah, Fuck you, Square!
  • Long Gunner 15: Die Hard 2. Two Words-- Glock. Nine. No such model has has ever existed (the Glock 17 pistol was the first Glock pistol, and the model numbers just get higher) and Mc Clain claims that it is a ceramic pistol impervious to airport x-rays and metal detectors. That's perfectly correct-- the 80% metal by weight, completely X-ray opaque pistol (not to mention brass and steel/lead ammunition) is invisible to x-ray. This wouldn't be such a problem if these pistols were not the entire fact that they are a significant threat to airport security. The mooks were shown to be rather cold-blooded. It would not have been far-fetched for them to have used ceramic knives (which actually exist) to kill several security guards and take their firearms.
  • fluffything: I already despise Simon Birch to begin with due to it's copious amount of Glurge and because the titular character is a smug holier-than-thou Jerkass. But, to me, the absolute DMOS of that film is when Simon accidentally kills his friend's mother with a wayward baseball while playing a game. The circumstances that cause the whole thing are so contrived they'd be better off for an over-the-top comedy than what is supposed to be a Tear Jerker moment. Not to mention that it would be impossible for Simon to even be able to hit a baseball hard enough to kill a human being. It's just a forced way to make Simon (who is already an unlikeable character in my eyes) look sympathetic by accidentally causing a tragedy that would be, again, impossible for a person of his size to do. It's so utterly stupid that I still can't believe anyone would think it could be taken seriously.
  • fluffything: While Gremlins 2: The New Batch is a movie I really enjoy, there is one scene that always grinds my gears. That, of course, being the whole "Kate hates President's Day" speech. It's a parody of the "Kate hates Christmas because her father died" speech, but it fails miserably. First of all, her reasoning for hating President's Day? Some guy who looked like Abraham Lincoln freaked her out when she was a child. That's it. No over-the-top tragedy. Just a guy who looks like Lincoln. Second, there is no indication or build-up to this revelation apart from a single line Mr. Futterman says ("Washington never gave up. Lincoln never gave up."). At least the first film drops hints throughout the film that Kate dislikes Christmas and has legitimate (and very tragic reasons) for doing so. And, finally, parodying what I consider a major Tear Jerker scene from the first film is just downright Dude, Not Funny. Yes, it was pretty over-the-top in terms of what happened. But, keep in mind that Kate's father died on Christmas, and quite horribly as well (IE: Getting stuck in a chimney and breaking his neck). Undermining such a heartbreaking revelation with a poorly-written "parody" of that scene is just mean spirited.
  • Blackbird Mizu: The Last Airbender was a lousy movie all around and did have a ton of DMOS. But one of the real kickers was the prison camp scene where earthbenders are imprisoned... on earth. And they don't even TRY to fight back until the Might Whitey heroes come in and give an rousing and inspirational speech. It made more sense in the TV series: they were stuck on a boat with no earth for a long time. There was plenty of time for them to be psychologically broken, so even when they were given weapons (some coal) they didn't bother fighting. But in the movie, they could've broken out the second they went in. It was completely moronic and you have to wonder who is dumber: the Fire Nation for imprisoning earthbenders on earth, or the earthbenders for not escaping. Another big DMOS? Zhao's death scene. Basically, he's killed by a group of nameless waterbenders who take him out with little effort. Really? Really? That's how you're killing the main villain of the movie and first season?
    • RAD Dman: Along with the above, there are three things this troper would like to point out about the earthbender prison scene (yes, there is more to complain about besides the jaw-dropping, reality-bending stupidity of putting the prison for people with control over the earth on a location literally surrounded by and on top of miles of earth). In the show, the episode with this situation helps establish Katara as a motivator and inspirational character, a very important part of her personality. In the film, this integral aspect is ditched and Aang gives the rousing speech instead. There are plenty of cardboard characters in the movie, and this certainly does not help Katara's status as one of them. Furthermore, directly preceding the trio being taken to the prison, a firebender guard arrests a young earthbender because he "was bending small rocks" at them. The DMOS here is what he says after, in the most ridiculous whining voice ever: "It really hurt!" It's something that should be watched for one to understand how awful that dialogue is. The worst part about that is that if this were actually said in the series (and maybe it was, I don't recall), it would have been a genuinely funny joke. But because up to this point the movie was taking itself so obnoxiously seriously and all humor was replaced with brooding, this line just comes out of nowhere and leaves people laughing for the wrong reasons. Finally, when the earthbenders do their prison riot and start using the tons of earth around and under them as weapons, we are treated to a shot of six earthbenders doing an unintentionally comical choreographed series of actions accompanied by silly-sounding shouts. The routine is ten steps or so and the only result is that a small poorly-CG'd rock starts moving slowly past them. It is hammy, it looks stupid, and the lameness of the result is stupefying. That one scene is a DMOS for anything related to Avatar: The Last Airbender, not just the movie.
  • Dr Zulu 2010: Highlander the Source was already an insult to the fans of the series, but the biggest middle finger of the franchise is the ending. In which Duncan managed to beat the Guardian not by decapitating him but by not attaking him while he's defenseless. Which allows him to gain the price which is the ability to have a baby. I'm not kidding. That actually means that all the good immortals and friends who died (Connor, Methos maybe, Joe and Reggie) died for nothing. Even worse, Anna outright says that there can be more than one immortal at the end. So yeah. Not only many immortals died pointlessly, they all died for a prize who is not worthy in the first place and can be earned not by violence but by love and being selfless. No wonder why the creator says it was all a nightmare by Duncan.
  • baconhead: I love David Zucker movies (except for this movie), I tolerated An American Carol up to certain point, and that is the court room, and what the movie tell us? That we need guns to kill ACLU lawyers! I'm not even joking about that last one, they flat out say we need guns to kill people who disagree with us on politics, what the.... I'm not even a pro-gun guy, and I could have made a better pro-gun argument, that's not funny, that's just Fascist.
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