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Louise Brooks 3382

A type of haircut, usually for women, of short-to-medium length with sharp lines. In one variety, the hair is cut off at about jaw length all the way around. Alternately, it may taper downwards from the back to the sides. It is similar to but distinct from the bowl cut (a.k.a. pudding basin cut). Some versions are known as a "pageboy" haircut. Fringe/bangs are optional. Can be Fetish Fuel for some men.

A feature of The Roaring Twenties; it's generally non-existent in The West before then, first appearing in fashion magazines in the late 1910s. Initially it was associated with "bad girls", and many men at the time were upset to see their wives and girlfriends with short, boyish hair. Many government and religious institutions opposed the bob and although they couldn't stop it, did their best to make life hell for women who happened to like having short hair. However, by the late 20s the bob was not only accepted, but embraced, even by men. Its heyday was about 1922-1932, but it had a comeback in The Fifties and The Sixties as a popular girl's haircut, but the reputation changed. They were no longer associated with "bad girls" but innocent (at least on the surface) Malt Shop dwelling bubblegum chewing teenage girls that used words like "Dreamboat" and "swell". The association has bounced around since The Seventies back and forth from "trendy" to "dowdy" with the current opinion being trendy but still shaking the dowdy association.

When applied to boys, this might be a subject to Viewer Gender Confusion. Surprisingly, this type of hair, even the longer varieties, was associated with young men between about 12 and 25,

Examples of Bob Haircut include:


Anime & Manga


Comic Books

  • Silhouette from Watchmen.
  • Holly Short in the Artemis Fowl graphic novels. In the original books she's described as having a crew-cut.


Comic Strips


Films -- Animation


Films -- Live-Action


Literature

  • Kel from the Protector of the Small series by Tamora Pierce. Probably has a great deal to do with the fact that she's, well, an actual page.
  • Crabbe from Harry Potter is described as having a pudding basin haircut. It's from Chamber of Secrets, from the Polyjuice Potion bit.
  • Sabriel from The Abhorsen Trilogy is described as having this type of haircut in the first book, although the cover illustration shows her with long hair.
  • In Cheaper By the Dozen, this is one of the battles the older girls fight with their parents as the Jazz Age begins. Eventually Anne, the oldest, bites the bullet and cuts her own hair. Because she "looks like she backed into a lawnmower," it has to be trimmed by a professional, and the parents relent and let all the other girls go along and get theirs done too.
  • F. Scott Fitzgerald's short story "Bernice Bobs Her Hair."
  • Francie from A Tree Grows in Brooklyn wants one, but her mother won't let her.
  • The title character of Jodi Lynn Anderson's May Bird series has this hairstyle.
  • Tiphaine d'Ath of the Emberverse wears this style. She would prefer to wear her hair shorter, but that isn't an acceptable option for a woman in the neo-medieval Portland Protective Association.


Live-Action TV


Music Videos

  • Lady Gaga in her video "Alejandro".
  • Meiko the Vocaloid. Gumi has a bob-type cut but it looks more like the typical flip.
  • Lily Allen sported one in the video for "22".


Tabletop Games

  • Appears to be part of the uniform for Sisters of Battle in Warhammer 40000.


Theater

  • In most recent major productions of the musical Spring Awakening, the character of Ilse, when possible.


Video Games


Visual Novels


Web Comics


Web Original


Western Animation


Real Life

  • Dorothy Hamill. By winning the gold in Innsbruck in '76, her version of the bob became a fashion staple in the U.S.
  • Karen O from the Yeah Yeah Yeahs.
  • Editor of American Vogue, Anna Wintour.
  • Jessie J is famous for hers.
  • Colleen Moore the silent film actress, in her films.
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