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  • Anvilicious: Edward Nygma developing and selling a TV add-on that literally makes people stupider by watching it.
  • Author's Saving Throw:
    • Though held to much higher esteem, the Burton movies were criticized over how loose Batman was about not killing his enemies. One of the things this movie was praised for was showing Batman being more thoughtful about that, as he found himself becoming the very thing he hated.
    • The depiction of Dick Grayson/Robin is considered to be not only one of the best things about this movie, but one of the best depictions of the character in general, and Chris O'Donnell was praised for his performance as a young man in mourning. The film also does a great job of Reimagining the Artifact with his costume; the signature Robin outfit is the basis for the uniform of the Flying Graysons and Dick's Robin outfit retains the color scheme to honor them, but the colors are muted to be less gaudy and the suit is otherwise an armored ensemble not unlike the Batsuit.
  • Awesome Music:
    • Two particularly memorable singles from the movie, "Hold Me Thrill Me Kiss Me Kill Me" by U2 and "Kiss From A Rose" by Seal (which won him four Grammys, including Song of the Year).
    • Elliot Goldenthal's score was not too shabby either, but your mileage may vary as to whether or not it was up to snuff with Danny Elfman's music.
    • Heck, the entire soundtrack is top-notch, including covers of "The Passenger" and "The Hunter Gets Captured By The Game", "Smash It Up", "8", and one that's totally appropriate for The Riddler: "Bad Days".
  • Contested Sequel: It's considered either fun despite being inferior and Lighter and Softer, or just outright disgraceful.
  • Ensemble Darkhorse: Even people who aren't fans of the film still enjoy its version of the Riddler. It certainly helps that he's played by Jim Carrey, one of the few actors who can still be entertaining in even the lousiest of movies, and has just as much screentime as Batman himself. The Carrey Riddler has had some influence on damn near every portrayal of the character since, particularly Wally Wingert's take in the Batman: Arkham games.
  • Fashion Victim Villain: The Riddler in spades. Two-Face's penchant for pink also qualifies.
  • Franchise Original Sin: The movie adds a lot more humor, big-scale action sequences, memorable architecture along with a more form-fitting Batsuit that looked (and was, for the actor) more mobile and comfortable. These elements worked in its favor for being somewhat truer to the comics, but in retrospect, these elements laid the groundwork for their escalation in Batman & Robin, which suffered enormous criticism for all these things (campy humor, gratuitously grandiose action, outright Bizarrchitecture and the infamous Bat-Nipples™) and made the superhero movie a hard sell for some time, with even the early X-Men and Spider-Man films having to fight an uphill battle for respect.
  • Ham and Cheese: Downside; the first movie in the franchise to have the infamous "Bat-Nipples"™. Upside; Jim Carrey babbling about "brainwave manipulation", stating that his neon wardrobe keeps him "safe while jogging at night". Ham and cheese on rye!
    • Not to mention Tommy Lee Jones, who appears to be having a rip-roaring good time playing Two-Face.
  • Harsher in Hindsight: The movie, while not up to the standards of the Burton/Keaton movies, was really not that bad on its own merits, and Jim Carrey's take on the Riddler was actually quite well-received. Unfortunately, Batman & Robin was so astronomically bad, it actually made this movie look worse by association.
  • Hilarious in Hindsight:
  • Ho Yay:
    • Two-Face and the Riddler are getting pretty damn affectionate towards the end of the film. They even cuddle!
    • The Riddler's last outfit change is inspired by Two-Face's half-suit, half-Elton John outfit. And he pretty much acts like a fanboy when he sees Two-Face on TV for the first time. Two Face is basically what inspires him to become a villain, and the first person he goes to see after his dramatic change. Fanboy, much?
    • Foe Yay: The screenwriters and Jim Carrey describe Nygma's obsession with Bruce as "love" and "like a stalker". Jim basically calls him Tsundere.
  • Memetic Mutation:
  • Mis Blamed: Joel Schumacher is a huge Batman fan and wanted to adapt Batman: Year One. It was the studio that forced him to go the Lighter and Softer route.
  • Moral Event Horizon:
    • Despite being an overall awesome and funny villain, Edward Nygma crossed it by pushing Fred Stickley out a window for firing him and trying to report him to the proper authorities. He cements it when he tampers with the security footage to make it look like a suicide, without caring one peep about the repercussions it would have for Stickley's loved ones.
    • Two-Face crosses it when he threatens to blow up a circus just so he can learn Batman's secret identity, and then murders the Flying Graysons when they try to stop him.
  • Narm:
    • The security guard's Captain Obvious yelling will make you wish he'd be boiled alive by that acid.
    • Bruce seeing a bat in Dr. Meridian's ink blot is played as a devastating stab into his psyche... except the thing is so clearly shaped like a bat that you'll just wonder how anyone could possibly see it as anything else.
  • Narm Charm: This is a very silly film, but it's acted and directed well enough that you can't watch it without at least one cheesy grin.
  • Nightmare Fuel:
    • In general, Two-Face is this. Despite his goofier moments, he's a twisted maniac (both physically and mentally) with a horrifying blood vendetta against Batman and is more than willing to murder anyone who gets in his way, including children, just to get back at him.
    • Fred Stickley's murder has shades of this. Edward Nygma managed to make it look like a suicide and started leaving clues before he even decided to create his villain identity.
      • The fake suicide tape counts as well. Between the crazed laughter as Stickley jumps to his death and the weird walk he does; it all looks so... strange.
        • Could be a moment of Fridge Brilliance as to why Bruce insists that Stickley's family gets the full death benefit package, even though suicide is not covered; Bruce sees the tape, and isn't convinced that it was a suicide.
    • The street gang that Dick chases down when he steals the Batmobile, with their eerie, garishly-painted faces. However, the prize goes to their skull-faced, deep-voiced leader.
  • Only the Creator Does It Right: The first non-Burton directed Batman movie, and also the one where the quality clearly started to decline.
  • The Problem with Licensed Games: The 16-bit game, published by Acclaim, is a Beat'Em Up that uses the Mortal Kombat fighter engine on loan from Midway Games. It was met with mediocre reviews. It also had huge loading times in the SNES/Super Famicom version. Easily one of the worst Batman games out there, The Angry Video Game Nerd gave this particular game a ripping apart during his two-part Batman special.
    • There were also 8-bit versions (Game Boy, Game Gear), as well as a PC version which was similar to the SNES game with added CGI cutscenes. A different game inspired by the same movie was released in the arcades, also by Acclaim, that was more similar to traditional side-scrolling brawlers like Final Fight. All these versions were panned by players and critics alike and Batman Forever became synonymous with The Problem with Licensed Games.
  • So Okay It's Average: The movie was exactly what the studio wanted, safe and marketable, and is considered disposable at worst and decent, light-hearted entertainment at best. It definitely helps to think of it as a loud, larger than life and very colorful action-adventure movie for the summer blockbuster set as opposed to a straight adaptation of Batman.
  • The Scrappy:
    • Opinions vary wildly about the cast of characters and how they were portrayed in this movie, but Tommy Lee Jones' take on Two-Face is consistently hated, due to taking a serious character torn between good and evil and reducing him to a cackling Joker-wannabe. Another point of sourness for the fanbase is how, in this incarnation, he does do-over flips of his coin until he gets the decision he wants, which really goes against his character. And let's not really get into the fact that, the Burton films, which are theoretically in-continuity with this film, set up Dent as being portrayed by Billy Dee Williams (which would've given an actor of color a huge leading role in a superhero movie), and then suddenly in Forever, Dent is portrayed by the very caucasian Jones!
    • The security guard whom Batman has to save from Two-Face's acid trap at the beginning, especially for the way he manages to make unreadably silly dialogue sound even more ridiculous out loud.
  • Tear Jerker:

Bruce: "It wasn't my fault. It never was..."

  • They Wasted a Perfectly Good Plot: The ingredients for a great story are all here. Bruce Wayne questioning his identity, revisiting his origins as Batman and considering hanging up the cowl. Bruce taking in Dick Grayson, a young man who has gone through the same tragedy he has, and trying to stop him from going down the same self-destructive path he did. The Riddler, a villain smart enough to build a company that rivals Wayne Enterprises, deduce Batman's identity and break into his secret lair. Two-Face, a very tragic and complex villain whose existence torments both sides of Bruce's identity and provides a dark mirror to his duality. Unfortunately, the film's focus on camp humor over plot and character development resulted in these elements not being utilized as good as they could have been.
  • Took the Bad Film Seriously:
    • Michael Gough as Alfred Pennyworth.
    • Val Kilmer makes a pretty sincere effort as Batman/Bruce Wayne, despite the uneven tone of the film.
  • Trailer Joke Decay: Batman's "I'll get drive-thru!" line at the beginning of the film would be pretty funny... if not for the fact that every trailer AND McDonald's tie-in commercial made use of it, making it simply eye-rolling (and an obvious attempt at Product Placement) by the time anyone actually saw the film.
  • Values Resonance: The Riddler's plan to use an electronic device as a Trojan Horse to steal people's personal information has became a LOT more relevant (and plausible) in our current internet-heavy culture.
  • Visual Effects of Awesome: As overly colorful this Batman film is, you'll seldom see these visuals or architecture in any other movie, leading to a unique-looking movie with a unique-looking production design. The stunts and action set-pieces also involve a huge amount of practical effects and sets that still look good to this day, compared to much of the badly-aged CGI found in some of the 2000s superhero fare that followed.
  • Vindicated by History: Edward Nygma becoming a rich, famous tech magnate by selling a gadget that entertains the mesmerized masses while secretly stealing their personal info and lurid secrets in the background is eerily prescient to the advent of smartphones and social media, and arguably makes the plot more biting in the 2010s than it was in 1995.
  • What an Idiot!:
    • It never occurs to Bruce to update the Batcave's security systems after Dick finds his way in, thus giving the Riddler a way to easily sneak inside.
    • The Batcave's "intruder alert" actually unveils the equipment and Batmobile rather than securing it!
    • For that matter, Bruce enters a machine that can read his mind in front of a crowd of people who can watch it on a screen. Through this, Riddler and Two-Face discover that he's Batman.
  • WTH? Casting Agency:
    • The script clearly indicates that Dick Grayson is supposed to be pretty young (early to mid-teens, probably). They cast Chris O'Donnell, who was 25 at the time and looks it. This makes a lot of the scenes focusing on his character creepy, nonsensical or both.
    • Tommy Lee Jones as Two-Face. Harvey Dent is supposed to look young and handsome, but Jones wasn't aging very well when he was cast. For comparison, Billy Dee Williams was 50 when he played Harvey Dent - and he still looked younger than his successor!
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